Strike action set to hit Shannon airport

first_imgLinkedin by Bernie [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up TRAVEL disruption is on the horizon with the cabin crew branch of IMPACT trade union having served notice of industrial action on Aer Lingus.Workers will stage a 24-hour work stoppage on Friday, May 30 , starting at a minute after midnight. Cabin crew members will place pickets at Shannon, Cork and Dublin Shannon airports for the duration of the stoppage.IMPACT official Michael Landers said that cabin crew were ready to take immediate action because the company had failed to engage on the rostering issue for so long. “Cabin crew have sought to engage with the company on this issue on several occasions over several years but the company has simply refused to consider anything other than the erratic rostering patterns that have become the norm at the airline. It has resulted in an exhausted crew who feel now that the only option left to them is the option of last resort, which is a work stoppage. It’s regrettable that it has come to this, but the current arrangements are unsustainable.”Mr Landers said that the cabin crew branch is confident that alternative rosters could be implemented with no loss of productivity or at any extra cost to the airline.Currently, cabin crew can work up to 60 hours in a seven day period, resulting in shift patterns of six working days and one rest day, followed by six more working days.Mr Landers explained that cabin crew have sought a roster similar to those for pilots at the airline, of five work days followed by three rest days. Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHL Advertisement WhatsApp Print No vaccines in Limerick yet Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended First Irish death from Coronavirus NewsBreaking newsBusinessStrike action set to hit Shannon airportBy Bernie English – May 13, 2014 576 center_img Previous articleContestants glam up for Miss Limerick pageantNext articleLimerick’s silent and shouted protest for Nigerian children Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April TAGSfeaturedLimerick Airport Shannon RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter Email Shannondoc operating but only by appointment last_img read more

Phil Lesh Announces Shows With Karl Denson, Robert Randolph, Scott Metzger, & More

first_imgToday, Phil Lesh announced two new Phil & Friends shows at his famed music venue in San Rafael, California, Terrapin Crossroads. Ahead of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe’s performance at Terrapin Crossroads on February 2nd, the Grateful Dead bassist will host two shows on January 30th and January 31st featuring Karl Denson, Chris Gelbuda, Scott Metzger, John Molo, Robert Randolph, and Barry Sless.You can snag tickets for either of these Phil Lesh & Friends shows or Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe show here.[Photo: Bob Schultz]last_img

Controversy over e-cigarette flavorings heats up

first_img Focus on nicotine overshadowed other hazards attached to smoking device Two chemicals widely used to flavor electronic cigarettes may impair the function of cilia in the human airway, according to a new study led by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Cilia are antennae-like protuberances that are present on 50 percent to 75 percent of the cells that line human airways. They play a key role in keeping the human airway clear of mucus and dirt and allow people to breathe easily and without irritation. Impaired cilia function has been linked to lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma.“Although chemicals used to flavor e-cigs are frequently used, little has been known about the mechanism of how they impact health. Our new study suggests that these chemicals may be harming cilia — the first line of defense in the lungs — by altering gene expression related to cilia production and function,” said Quan Lu, associate professor of environmental genetics and pathophysiology. Lu and Joseph Allen, assistant professor of exposure assessment science, are co-senior authors of the study.The study was published today in Scientific Reports. It is the first to look at the impact of flavoring chemicals in human epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the lungs.Millions of people use e-cigarettes, and a recent rise in use among school-age children has alarmed public health experts. In mid-December, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams labeled youth e-cigarette use an epidemic. Scientific studies examining the potential health effects of e-cigarettes and their myriad chemical components have not kept pace with the rise in use. “E-cigarette users are heating and inhaling flavoring chemicals that were never tested for inhalation safety.” — Joseph Allen, Harvard Chan School Teen vaping rising fast, research says Trend concerns Harvard analyst, though practice is preferable to smoking tobacco Study supports need for randomized clinical trials to clarify the role of e-cigarettes in smoking cessation   In addition to being used in e-cigarettes, diacetyl is used as a flavoring agent in foods such as butter-flavored microwave popcorn, baked goods, and candy; it can create a variety of flavors. Diacetyl is considered a safe ingredient in foods, but evidence suggests that it can be dangerous when inhaled. It has been previously linked with bronchiolitis obliterans, a debilitating disease that was dubbed “popcorn lung” because it first appeared in workers who inhaled artificial butter flavor in microwave popcorn processing facilities. After the link between diacetyl and popcorn lung was reported, 2,3-pentanedione was sometimes used as a substitute.In the new study, researchers used novel lab techniques that allowed them to examine the impact of both diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione on epithelial cells in a system that closely mimicked the human airway epithelium in vivo. They exposed normal human bronchial epithelial cells to the chemicals for 24 hours. They found that both diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione were linked to changes in gene expression that could impair both the production and function of cilia.In addition, the researchers found that even low levels of both chemicals affected gene expression, suggesting that current standards for safe limits of exposure to these chemicals for workers may not be sufficient. There are no such standards for e-cigarette users, according to the authors.Other Harvard Chan authors of the study included lead author Hae-Ryung Park, Michael O’Sullivan, Jose Vallarino, Jin-Ah Park, and David Christiani.Funding for the study came from a National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS) R01 grant ES022230 and a Harvard NIEHS Center grant (P30ES000002).center_img E-cigarettes’ usefulness for quitting smoking uncertain In a previous study, Allen and Harvard Chan colleagues found flavoring chemicals — primarily diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione — in more than 90 percent of e-cigarettes they tested.“E-cigarette users are heating and inhaling flavoring chemicals that were never tested for inhalation safety,” said Allen. “Although some e-cig manufacturers are stating that they do not use diacetyl or 2,3-pentandione, it begs an important question — what chemicals, then, are they using for flavoring? Further, workers receive warnings about the dangers of inhaling flavoring chemicals. Why aren’t e-cig users receiving the same warnings?” Chemical flavorings found in e-cigarettes linked to respiratory disease Relatedlast_img read more