Agency knew of carer’s sex crime

first_imgStuff.co.nz 28 Sep 2012Two Palmerston North children were left in the care of a convicted child sex offender for more than a year before Child, Youth and Family responded to their mother’s pleas to intervene. The mother alerted CYF in June last year when she discovered two of her three children were being cared for by their paternal grandfather, who is a convicted child sex offender. The man served seven years in prison from 2002 for historical sex offences, including rape. His victims were his two stepdaughters, one of whom was aged only 9 when the offending began. CYF intervened last month, and has admitted it should have acted sooner. The woman said she repeatedly told CYF workers her children were being left in their grandfather’s care while her former partner, with whom she has a shared custody arrangement, worked night shifts. The children were not in CYF care, but the agency had been working with the family since March. CYF operations general manager Marama Edwards said the woman raised concerns with the agency about the grandfather’s past in June, 2011 and January this year. “In raising this she also stated, on more than one occasion, that she didn’t feel this person’s history was an issue.” A Palmerston North Maori Women’s Refuge staff member has confirmed the refuge had been advocating on behalf of the woman since February. “We have looked into the circumstances of this case and, at the time, we should have completed a more thorough assessment of the children’s care arrangements,” Ms Edwards said. “A full safety plan is now in place.”….She said her experience had shattered her confidence in systems she had trusted. “That’s why New Zealand has a high rate of child abuse, because it is like this,” she said. “It has taken me going to the media to get them to do their job properly.”http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/7743464/Agency-knew-of-carers-sex-crimelast_img read more

A’s top pick Kyler Murray makes decision on NFL Combine

first_imgOklahoma QB Kyler Murray has decided to attend the NFL … If Kyler Murray is actually going to be in camp with the A’s this spring, he’ll be taking at least a brief hiatus about two weeks into it.Murray is deciding to attend the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis later this month, according to ESPN’s Adam Schefter. The combine takes place Feb. 26-March 4 in Indianapolis, just 11 days after Murray is expected to report along with the rest of the A’s position players Feb. 15 in Arizona.last_img

Quick drydown sneaking up on Ohio corn fields

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With the lack of nitrogen throughout the growing season and some 90 degree days in the past week, some Ohio corn fields are drying down quicker than many farmers expect. In this week’s DuPont Pioneer Field Report, Account Manager Troy Putnam talks about the risk that comes with corn that dries down ahead of schedule.last_img

Samsung granted permission to test self-driving cars in California

first_imgSamsung is the latest technology company to receive a permit to test self-driving cars in California, but does not plan on launching its own automotive anytime soon.The South Korean electronics giant will instead work on ‘control systems’ for self-driving vehicles. It has already conducted tests in its home country with Hyundai cars.See Also: Samsung challenges Google with Connect Home Wi-Fi meshSamsung has a major investment in Renault which could be used as a partner in the self-driving development, although it has not publically tested its technology in a Renault vehicle.The company acquired vehicle audio firm Harman for $8 billion last year, seen as a power move to enter the in-car entertainment and self-driving market.Even though Samsung has not made as large a footprint in the self-driving market as Google, Baidu, and Uber, it has the funds and talent available to make it a prominent player.That said, the Galaxy S8 maker may find it difficult to attract partners when rivals are showing millions of autonomous miles driven or advanced artificial intelligence, two things Samsung hasn’t shown.Samsung’s largest rival in the mobile industry, Apple, has also kept its self-driving developments quiet. It was only a few months ago that the iPhone maker received a permit in California, and has only just started testing three Lexus cars on public roads.Apple is reportedly planning to launch a shuttle service for employees, going from Palo Alto to the Infinite Loop headquarters. Samsung has not said if it will launch a similar service, or what cars it intends to test in California. IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Tags:#Apple#Autonomous#California#connected car#driverless#Harman#Internet of Things#IoT#Samsung#Self-Driving#taxi For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Related Posts center_img 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… David Currylast_img read more

Vine: Patriots TE, Arizona Alum Rob Gronkowski Sings UA Fight Song At Super Bowl Media Day

first_imgRob Gronkowski at Super Bowl media day.Today is Super Bowl Media Day in Glendale, Arizona, the site of Super Bowl XLIX. There’s a horde of journalists and other “media” assembled to speak with the players and coaches, and given the wide-ranging reporting angles taking by those asking questions, some atypical topics get covered and some funny exchanges get produced.Take New England Patriots star tight end Rob Gronkowski, back in the state where he excelled in college for the Arizona Wildcats. Gronkowski was asked to sign his alma mater’s fight song, “Bear Down Arizona,” and he granted that request with a smile.Apparently, this happened more than once:Gronk was asked twice to sing Bear Down Arizona. He obliged both times.— Daniel Berk (@DSBerk) January 27, 2015Known for his outgoing, fun-loving personality, Gronkowski hasn’t been shy at all at this his second Super Bowl Media Day. With him, no topic is off-limits, even the erotic novel a fan wrote that starred him as the love interest.I think Gronkowski just read a line from that Gronk-based erotic novel. #SBMediaDay Are you not entertained?!?!— Randy Scott (@RandyScottESPN) January 27, 2015We most certainly are.last_img read more

Video: While You Were Sleeping, Alabama RB Derrick Henry Was Up Working Out At 4:08 A.M.

first_imgDerrick Henry shedding a tackle.TUSCALOOSA, AL – NOVEMBER 21: Derrick Henry #2 of the Alabama Crimson Tide breaks a tackle by Zane Cruz #43 of the Charleston Southern Buccaneers at Bryant-Denny Stadium on November 21, 2015 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)Alabama back Derrick Henry is a physical specimen, and thanks to a recent Instagram post, we might have a clue as to how that happened. While most of us were sleeping (or stumbling back home after a late night out) at 4:08 in the morning, Henry was busy getting after it in the gym. The season is still just under four months away, but Henry looks like he’s ready to take a few hand-offs to the house. He’ll get his first chance on September 5 in Dallas, when the Crimson Tide take on Wisconsin.last_img

Former College Basketball Stars To Compete For $2 Million Prize In This Year’s TBT Tournament

first_imgtbtTwitter/@thetournamentLast year, The Basketball Tournament really took off, with teams from across the country playing for a $1 million cash prize. Many of the top teams in the field are primarily comprised of alumni of some of college basketball’s most proud programs. This year, Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky, Syracuse, and Villanova are all teams well represented in the 60-team field.#TBT2016 $2M. Winner takes all. What team do you play for? pic.twitter.com/HZQNDIFHmM— TBT (@thetournament) February 23, 2016Some teams are true alumni squads, like Syracuse’s “Boeheim Army,” while others, the Kansas Morris Twins-sponsored FOE, are just heavy on a particular school. Here are some of the alumni team rosters, as well as the other notable former college stars from across the country.Next: ACC Alumni >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7last_img

Drug company founder charged with pushing powerful opioid

first_imgPHOENIX – U.S. prosecutors levelled charges Thursday against the billionaire founder of an opioid medication maker that has faced increasing scrutiny from authorities across the country over allegations of pushing prescriptions of powerful painkillers amid a drug epidemic that is claiming thousands of lives each year.The fraud and racketeering case against Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor came the same day President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency.The case naming Kapoor follows indictments against the company’s former CEO and other executives and managers on allegations that they provided kickbacks to doctors to prescribe a potent opioid called Subsys.In the new indictment, Kapoor, 74, of Phoenix, and the other defendants are accused of offering bribes to doctors to write large numbers of prescriptions for the fentanyl-based pain medication that is meant only for cancer patients with severe pain. Most of the people who received prescriptions did not have cancer.It also alleges that they conspired to mislead and defraud insurance providers who were reluctant to approve payment for the drug when it was prescribed for patients without cancer.U.S. prosecutors in Boston brought the case as they vowed to go after problem opioid makers similar to how they target “cartels or a street-level drug dealer.”“In the midst of a nationwide opioid epidemic that has reached crisis proportions, Mr. Kapoor and his company stand accused of bribing doctors to overprescribe a potent opioid and committing fraud on insurance companies solely for profit,” said Acting U.S. Attorney William D. Weinreb in Boston.A judge set bail at $1 million for Kapoor, saying he must wear electronic monitoring and surrender his passports. Kapoor, who was arrested earlier Thursday, entered court in basketball shorts, tennis shoes and a T-shirt, his long, grey hair disheveled.“He is not guilty of these charges, he intends to fight it vigorously,” defence attorney Brian T. Kelly said outside court. Kelly is a high-profile Boston lawyer and former federal prosecutor who successfully tried imprisoned gangster James “Whitey” Bugler.Kapoor came to the U.S. from India to get his Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry from the University of Buffalo, where the pharmacy school is named for him and his wife to honour their longtime philanthropy.Kapoor, whose worth Forbes estimated at $1.75 billion, also founded a company that operates seven restaurants including the Japanese eatery Roka Aker in Scottsdale.In Massachusetts, former Insys CEO Michael L. Babich and five other former executives and managers are set to go to trial in October 2018 and have pleaded not guilty. The latest indictment brings new charges against Babich and others.Several former Insys employees and health care providers have pleaded guilty to felony charges around the country, including in Alabama and Connecticut. A Rhode Island doctor pleaded guilty Wednesday to accepting kickbacks in return for prescribing the highly addictive fentanyl spray.A spokesman for Arizona-based Insys said this week that the company is under new management and has replaced nearly all its original sales staff. It says it takes responsibility for the actions of its former employees.“We have taken necessary and appropriate steps to prevent past mistakes from happening in the future, and are committed to conducting business according to high ethical standards and the interests of patients,” the company said in a statement Wednesday. “We also continue to work with relevant authorities to resolve issues related to the misdeeds of former employees.”Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri said evidence from a congressional probe she launched this year suggested that Insys had “gotten away with fines that amounted to a slap on the wrist for actions that helped fuel a nationwide epidemic that’s claimed hundreds of thousands of American lives.”Kapoor was named the drugmaker’s president and CEO in November 2015 after Babich resigned without explanation.Federal authorities apparently have been investigating the company for some time. In late 2013, Insys said it received a subpoena from the Department of Health and Human Services asking for documents tied to the commercialization of Subsys. Nearly a year later, it received a subpoena from U.S. prosecutors in Boston for documents connected with sales and marketing practices for the drug.In addition to the criminal charges, states have been suing Insys over its marketing practices.Meanwhile, the company has been active in politics, donating $500,000 last year to an Arizona campaign to defeat a ballot measure to legalize marijuana.The company’s stock price has taken a big tumble in recent months amid the legal issues. Insys stock plunged more than 20 per cent Thursday.___Associated Press writers Jacques Billeaud in Phoenix and Geoff Mulvihill in Cherry Hill, New Jersey contributed to this report.last_img read more

Trump slams Trump President signs document rebuking own views on trade Canada

first_imgWASHINGTON – Donald Trump’s views on trade have taken a battering in a newly released report that was not only published by his own White House, but presented under his own signature.The self-rebuke includes some of his talking points about Canada.The president regularly bemoans a trade deficit with the northern neighbour. Once again Monday, he was complaining about Canadian trade, saying: “We lose a lot with Canada. People don’t know it. Canada’s very smooth. They have you believe that it’s wonderful. And it is, for them. Not wonderful for us.”Far less smooth is the consistency of U.S. messaging.A far more positive story about trade appears in the newly released 2018 White House “Economic Report of the President” — it’s an annual document prepared by the president’s team, with Trump himself signing the introductory foreword.The document smashes at a few of the president’s favoured themes.One involves the supposed trade deficit with Canada. While Trump keeps talking about it, and insisting it exists, the document he signed states the opposite — that Canada is among the few countries in the world with whom the U.S. runs a surplus.The document states this at least three times.For example, it says, “All countries show a (U.S.) services surplus offsetting a goods deficit, with the U.S. running a net bilateral surplus only with Canada and the United Kingdom.”And again: “The United States ran a trade surplus of $2.6 billion with Canada on a balance-of-payments basis.”And once again: “The United States has free trade agreements … with a number of countries — some of which represent net trade surpluses for the United States (Canada and Singapore), and some of which represent deficits (Mexico and South Korea).”There’s more.The report also contradicts the president by stating that trade has helped the U.S. economy grow; that economies are shifting away from manufacturing; that foreign trade is increasingly important to the modern economy; that America has a good record of success in international dispute panels at the WTO; and that you can’t rework trade agreements to fix an import-export deficit.“Trade and economic growth are strongly and positively correlated,” the White House report says.The report does concede that trade deals create winners and losers in a country. States along the border have been the biggest winners in NAFTA, it says. Its general conclusion, however, is that trade creates jobs and wealth; it cites a study that every percentage point increase in trade-to-GDP ratio raises per capita income by between 0.5 and 2 per cent.“(This) is a stunning rebuke of … the president and his trade team,” Scott Lincicome of the pro-market Cato Institute tweeted after the report was released last week.The 563-page document was produced by Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers. He appointed the council.Meanwhile, there are reports in U.S. media that Trump is looking to promote trade hawk Peter Navarro to a more prominent position in the White House.Do these kinds of facts even matter to Trump?That could soon become clearer as he faces major decisions in the next few weeks. One involves whether to continue NAFTA negotiations beyond the spring; another involves whether to impose global steel and aluminum tariffs and whether any tariffs should apply to Canada, the U.S.’s No. 1 supplier.Affected Canadians are watching to see whether he’ll heed his own findings.“We’re all guessing the moves of a non-conventional actor,” said Flavio Volpe of Canada’s auto-parts manufacturers’ association, which has a stake in both the NAFTA and steel decisions.“None of us believe that, if they do the calculus, they’ll see that (punishing Canada) is in their best interest. But of course we’re all modelling in the fact that logic isn’t always the overlord with this administration.”He likened Trump’s modus operandi to that from his former career, as a real-estate developer in the cut-throat New York market. He said the president may have internalized the life lesson that, when there’s stress over the fate of a project, contractors and suppliers can be squeezed for better terms.“Maybe we just have a New York real-estate developer in the White House,” he said.That’s similar to a theory from Edward Alden of the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations. He writes that Trump sees chaos as his ally, because if there’s uncertainty over trade, companies are likelier to build new projects in the U.S.He shared that view in a piece for Politico titled, “The Real Game Trump Is Playing on NAFTA: He isn’t negotiating. He’s stalling for time.”Some economic analysts have even tried to put a price tag on this uncertainty. According to the Bank of Canada, and Scotiabank, a lack of clarity over NAFTA into 2019 could trim foreign investment in Canada and cost it 0.2 per cent of GDP through next year.last_img read more

Trump once boasted of market gains now tweets cause drops

first_imgThe year started with President Donald Trump promising big growth for stocks.In January, he shared excitement over a “big day” on Wall Street. By June, the president was tweeting: “Stock Market up almost 40% since the Election.” When the market hit a record high on Aug. 25, Trump tweeted, “Congratulations U.S.A.!” And there was more excitement on Oct. 3: “The Stock Market just reached an All-Time High during my Administration for the 102nd Time, a presidential record, by far, for less than two years.”Now, as those gains are wiped away, the president is attacking the Federal Reserve for the stock market’s woes — and those tweets are pushing share prices even lower.On Monday, stocks slid an additional 2 to 3 per cent after another Trump tweet-attack on the Fed and an effort by his Treasury secretary to calm investors’ fears that only seemed to make matters worse.The market is now on track for its worst year since 2008 and its worst December since 1931, during the depths of the Great Depression.The market has been roiled for most of the month over concerns about a slowing global economy, the escalating trade dispute with China and another interest rate increase by the Federal Reserve.The past two trading days, however, have been dominated by something else: major losses following tweets from the president criticizing Fed Chairman Jerome Powell and the central bank.Trump’s Monday morning tweet heightened fears about the economy being destabilized by a president who wants control over the Fed.“The only problem our economy has is the Fed,” the president tweeted. “They don’t have a feel for the Market, they don’t understand necessary Trade Wars or Strong Dollars or even Democrat Shutdowns over Borders. The Fed is like a powerful golfer who can’t score because he has no touch — he can’t putt!”Peter Conti-Brown, a financial historian at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, said: “We’ve never seen anything like this full-blown and full-frontal assault. This is a disaster for the Fed, a disaster for the president and a disaster for the economy.”Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin made a round of calls to the heads of the nation’s six largest banks Sunday and said they assured him they have ample money to finance their normal operations. It was an attempt to calm jitters, but it only raised new concerns about the economy.Most economists expect growth to slow in 2019, not slide into a full-blown recession. In fact, many economic barometers still look encouraging. Unemployment is at 3.7 per cent, the lowest since 1969. Inflation is tame. Pay growth has picked up. Consumers boosted their spending this holiday season.Fed board members are nominated by the president, but they’ve historically made decisions independent of the White House. Trump nominated Powell last year to become chairman.But the president has voiced his anger over the Fed’s decision to raise its key short-term rate four times in 2018. Those measures are intended to prevent the economy from overheating.Trump’s latest remarks only created more uncertainty for already unnerved investors who have seen all of this year’s stock market gains evaporate.“Now we’re having a correction and we’re down for the year, so the narrative people get drawn to is that perhaps his more unpredictable policies are bad for the market,” said Craig Birk, chief investment officer at Personal Capital. “The separation between the president and the Fed, maybe just causes a little more concern than it would have a few months ago.”___AP Economics Writer Josh Boak contributed to this report from WashingtonAlex Veiga, The Associated Presslast_img read more