NAVAJOLAND: Walk honors Vietnam veterans, families

first_img AliceMarie Slaven-Emond says: By Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 1, 2013 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (2) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 3, 2013 at 11:23 pm -As the article mentions, a disproportionate number of Navajo have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. __-It’s my feeling that ALSO a disproportionate and outright LACK of honor are bestowed upon, and critically needed services provided for, …the Navajo peoples and their veterans… -Some are honoring “Gold Star Wives” this week of April, but one would be hard pressed to find ANY of those honoring Navajo Wives for THEIR great sacrifices… -As a veteran, a man who calls Arizona his home, I see greatness in the Navajo Veterans, peoples and nation… -Isn’t it a terrible WRONG that the original 29 Code Talkers endured after WWII ending in 1945 and waiting until the year 2000 for their honorable recognition (Congressional Gold Medal) original 29 AND Congressional Silver Medal for those who came after…? …These men DESERVE our respect, our gratitude AND our continued concern ! W. Bill Springer Viet-Combat-Vet, US Navy, Honorable~ Submit a Press Release NAVAJOLAND: Walk honors Vietnam veterans, families Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI W. Bill Springer says: Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska [Episcopal News Service] Military service is an historical tradition in Navajo culture.In Mike Bekis’ immediate family, for instance, 38 members have served or are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.“Just like my five uncles before us, they were all World War II [veterans], all of us have stepped up,” said Bekis, in a telephone call from Farmington, New Mexico, with ENS. “And we just followed in their footsteps.”In May 2012, Bekis, who served in the U.S. Army from 1975-1980, began organizing a walk to honor and remember Vietnam veterans, like his brother Robert Bekis, who upon their return from service received nothing approaching a hospitable welcome.“A lot of these Vietnam vets came home to nothing,” said Bekis. “They got spit on coming through the gates … rotten fruits and vegetables and balloons filled with animal blood thrown at them. No one gave a damn about them, they were drafted they did not ask to go there.”The Upper Fruitland Vietnam Veterans and the Episcopal Church in Navajoland together sponsored the Vietnam Veterans Remembrance Honor Walk from Thoreau, New Mexico, to Farmington, New Mexico, 117 miles along the NM 371, known as the “Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway.” Photo/Bishop David BaileyThe Upper Fruitland Vietnam Veterans and the Episcopal Church in Navajoland together sponsored the Vietnam Veterans Remembrance Honor Walk and Bike Run, titled “A welcome home for the Vietnam Veterans that they never received.” The March 25-30 walk went from Thoreau, New Mexico, to Farmington, New Mexico, 117 miles along the NM 371, known as the “Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway,” and culminated in a celebration held at a gymnasium in Upper Fruitland, New Mexico.“Saturday, March 30th, I was honored and privileged to join the Navajo Vietnam veterans and walk with them for the last 12 miles of their 117 mile ‘Vietnam Veterans Welcome Home March,’” said Navajoland Bishop David Bailey in an e-mail to ENS. “It is important to our Episcopal Church in Navajoland as a response to our many Episcopal veterans who have proudly served in Vietnam, Iraq’s two wars and in Afghanistan and to their families.”Many of the veterans suffer “post-war issues,” added Bailey, and in response the church has begun a ministry of recognition, which provides a time and place for veterans to meet and share with each other and their families.“We identify resources to meet their specific needs and give them congregational support as they move toward healing,” he said.March 29 marked the day the last of Vietnam troops returned home 40 years ago, and in 2012 President Barack Obama and New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez designated the last week of March as a time to honor Vietnam Veterans.“This march during Holy Week is a journey for the Navajo Vietnam veterans; a pilgrimage toward healing. When the march was planned, we didn’t know it was going to be during Holy Week.  The dates just fell into it. I believe it happened for a reason, it is part of the mystery,” said Deacon Cornelia Eaton, who also serves as Bailey’s assistant. “The march is about acceptance; about being welcomed home. War is not a good thing. It is not to be praised, and unfortunately war does happen, and our warriors have to go off into it.”“Our veterans have suffered deeply–stories of broken marriages, attempted suicides, alcohol and drug addictions, and the list goes on.”Chapter houses, which are similar to town halls, and various veterans groups sponsored walkers, who in addition to veterans, included spouses and children of fallen soldiers who walked in their remembrance, said Eaton, “They have suffered too. This march is a start of reconciliation, forgiveness, and healing for veterans and their families.”Two Navajoland Episcopal churches, St. Luke’s in the Desert in Carson, New Mexico, and St. Michael’s in Upper Fruitland, have started outreach ministries to veterans.“Navajoland is responding to the needs of our warriors and families with love and compassion as we are called to offer hope to a broken world,” said Eaton. “The brokenness that our veterans face is a lifelong challenge.”In 1978, the Episcopal Church carved out sections of the dioceses of Rio Grande, Arizona and Utah – areas within and surrounded by the 27,000-square-mile Navajo reservation – to create the Navajoland Area Mission. It was an effort toward unification of language, culture and families.Between 125,000 and 150,000 Navajo live on the reservation, which is about the size of West Virginia, and a disproportionate number of Navajo have served in the U.S. Armed Forces.According to the U.S. Census Bureau approximately four to seven percent of Navajo people living on reservation lands are veterans. Not unlike other veterans, the veterans of Navajoland suffer the effects of war and like all veterans these courageous patriots deserve our help and support as a way of offering thanks for their service to the nation, said the Rev. Wally A. Jensen, executive officer to the bishop for armed services and federal ministries based in Washington, D.C.“Perhaps the most well-known of the Navajo people’s military service begins with the Code Talkers of World War II who used their Navajo language as a code which was never broken during the war,” said Jensen in an e-mail to ENS. “Military historians credit the Navajo Code Talkers with helping to win the war in the Pacific Theater. Recently the Navajo people have built a monument to honor the Navajo warriors who continued to serve in the military through World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.”The Rev. Patrick Finn, a U.S. Navy chaplain, represented Bishop Suffragan for the Armed Services and Federal Ministries James Magness during the celebration at the end of the march in Upper Fruitland.“My particular interest is the healing that can take place when our current veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan have a safe place to share their story with veterans from the Vietnam War and other conflicts,” said Finn in an e-mail to ENS.  “I am beginning a project called ‘Until Every Story is Heard,’ which is encouraging religious and community based organizations to provide safe places for our veterans to share with other veterans.“Even though there are several very good programs already, connections are not being made between our veterans and our local communities.”Before being called up to active duty, Finn served from 1995-2002 as the rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Park City, Utah, and worked closely with the late Bishop Steven Plummer and his wife, Deacon Catherine Plummer, organizing mission trips and medical missions, he said.“Being with the Diné (Navajo) provides an opportunity to see the impact on veterans who are isolated and far away from many resources,” he said. “I see this as part of my Baptismal Covenant, ‘Will you do all in your power to support these persons in their life in Christ?’”Finn’s focus, he said, is to engage Episcopal churches in this much needed and valuable outreach to the one percent of the population that has served in the United States’ most recent conflicts.“A yellow ribbon on bumper is great but doesn’t go much further than that,” said Finn, during a telephone interview with ENS. “People want to support veterans but don’t know how to.In the case of Vietnam veterans, they have suffered for 30 and 40 years, and Finn is concerned, he said, that the same thing not happen to the men and women returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.All four of Robert Bekis’ sons have gone into the military, serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, and none of them, their uncle Mike Bekis said, have felt comfortable with publicity upon their return home.“When they came home they didn’t want nothing” he said. “They said, ‘We don’t need this publicity. We just want to come home to family and friends.’”“I asked, ‘How come you don’t want it?’ And they said, ‘Look at my dad, he didn’t come home to that, we just want to follow in his footsteps.’”The average age of a young man leaving the Navajo Nation for Vietnam was 17 years, and the military had 13 months to turn them into men before sending them to war.“It’s a good thing the Episcopal Church is a helping hand here, it’s a long time coming to welcome these guys home,” said Mike Bekis, a former St. Michael’s choir boy.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 2, 2013 at 12:03 pm I just moved from Navajoland Diocese. The need for PTSD treatment and recognition of the service Navajo (and all other Native peoples) peoples have given to the Armed Forces of the US is over due. This diocese is coming out of the “let everyone do it for us” to “we can do this for our own”. With a little encouragement and the “how-to” help is given, the Navajo people are setting a president for many other minorities people under in credibly limited resources. I am grateful to have been a “belagona” among my Navajo sisters and brothers. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Navajoland Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Indigenous Ministries, Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Presiding Bishop’s Lent Message 2014

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Presiding Bishop’s Lent Message 2014 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (2) Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Lent, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Note: the following is presented in English and Spanish“So as you enter Lent, consider how you will live in solidarity with those who are hungry, or broken, or ill in one way or another,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in her Lent Message 2014.The video of the Presiding Bishop’s message is here.The video is downloadable here.Lent is a season of reflection that begins on Ash Wednesday (March 5) and concludes on Easter (April 20).The following is the Presiding Bishop’s Lent Message 2014.The reality is that the season of Lent, which Christians have practiced for so many centuries, is about the same kind of yearning for greater light in the world, whether you live in the Northern Hemisphere or the Southern Hemisphere.The word “Lent” means “lengthen” and it’s about the days getting longer.  The early Church began to practice a season of preparation for those who would be baptized at Easter, and before too long other members of the Christian community joined those candidates for baptism as an act of solidarity.It was a season during which Christians and future Christians learned about the disciplines of the faith – prayer and study and fasting and giving alms, sharing what they have.But the reality is that, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere, the lengthening days were often times of famine and hunger, when people had used up their winter food stores and the spring had not yet produced more food to feed people.  Acting in solidarity with those who go hungry is a piece of what it means to be a Christian.  To be a follower of Jesus is to seek the healing of the whole world.And Lent is a time when we practice those disciplines as acts of solidarity with the broken and hungry and ill and despised parts of the world.I would invite you this Lent to think about your Lenten practice as an exercise in solidarity with all that is – with other human beings and with all of creation.  That is most fundamentally what Jesus is about. He is about healing and restoring that broken world.So as you enter Lent, consider how you will live in solidarity with those who are hungry, or broken, or ill in one way or another.May you have a blessed Lent this year, and may it yield greater light in the world.The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchMensaje de Cuaresma del 2014de la Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori“Al entrar en la Cuaresma, considere cómo viviría en solidaridadcon los que tienen hambre, o están quebrantados, o enfermos de una u otra manera”.[28 de febrero de  2014] “Al entrar en la temporada de la Cuaresma, considere cómo viviría en solidaridad con los que tienen hambre, o están quebrantados, o enfermos de una u otra manera”,  dijo la Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal Katharine Jefferts Schori en su mensaje de Cuaresma del 2014.“El video con el mensaje de la Obispa Presidente está aquí.La Cuaresma es un tiempo de reflexió que comienza el Miércoles de Ceniza (5 de marzo) y concluye el día de la Pascua (20 de abril).A continuación es el mensaje de Cuaresma del 2014 de la Obispa Presidente.La realidad es que el tiempo de Cuaresma, que los cristianos han practicado por muchos siglos, es sobre el mismo anhelo de tener una mayor luz en el mundo, ya sea que usted vive en el hemisferio norte o el hemisferio sur.La palabra “Cuaresma” significa el periodo de 40 días que ahora constituye la estación, y puede reflejar el periodo de 40 años en el desierto, cuando los hebreos buscaban la tierra prometida.  En el hemisferio norteño, la Cuaresma es un tiempo cuando los días cada están alargando, y la tierra está experimentando más luz. La Iglesia antigua comenzó a practicar un tiempo de preparación para aquellos que serían bautizados en la Pascua, y en poco tiempo otros miembros de la comunidad cristiana se unieron a esos candidatos para el bautismo como un acto de solidaridad.Fue una temporada en la que los cristianos y los futuros cristianos aprendieron sobre las disciplinas de la fe – la oración, el estudio, el ayuno y la ofrenda, compartiendo lo que tienen.Pero la realidad es que, sobre todo en el hemisferio norte, los días de alargamiento a menudo eran con frecuencia épocas  de hambruna, cuando las personas habían agotado sus reservas de alimentos de invierno y la primavera aún no había producido más alimentos para alimentar a la gente. Actuar en solidaridad con los que pasan hambre es una pieza clave de lo que significa ser cristiano. Ser un seguidor de Jesús es buscar la sanación de todo el mundo.Y la Cuaresma es el tiempo en que practicamos esas disciplinas tales como actos de solidaridad con los quebrantados, hambrientos y enfermos en los lugares menospreciados del mundoLes invito en esta Cuaresma a pensar acerca de su práctica cuaresmal como un ejercicio de solidaridad con todo lo que es – con otros seres humanos y con toda la creación. Eso es lo fundamental de lo que es Jesús. Jesús es sobre sanar y restaurar ese mundo quebrantado.Así que al entrar en la Cuaresma, considere cómo va a vivir en solidaridad con los que tienen hambre, o están quebrantados o enfermos de una u otra manera.Que este año tenga una Cuaresma bendecida, y que esta  ilumine con mayor fuerza el mundo.Reverendísima Katharine Jefferts SchoriObispa Presidente y PrimadoLa Iglesia Episcopal Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Patricia Schneider says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori center_img Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Posted Feb 28, 2014 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis March 12, 2014 at 10:59 pm Strategic words from the Presiding Bishop invite the body of Christ to stand in solidarity with other human beings and with all of creation. She identifies “the other” as those who are hungry, or broken, or ill in one way or another. Let us love the unlovable and stand in solidarity with them. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Aaron Paul Collins says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 February 28, 2014 at 2:46 pm Wonderful lesson, wonderful opportunity to reflect and act. Thank you. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Iglesias coordinan campaña de socorro en el dilatado conflicto de…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Entre los suministros de alimentos distribuidos por SUDRA se incluyen maíz, frijoles, aceite de cocinar y otros artículos esenciales. Foto/ SUDRA.[Episcopal News Service] Mientras el violento conflicto en Sudán del Sur prosigue en su 17º. mes, la Iglesia Episcopal en el país devastado por la guerra y sus asociados globales mantienen su firme compromiso de proporcionarles ayuda inmediata a los cientos de miles de desplazados internos y de alcanzar el objetivo último de la paz y la reconciliación.“En medio del conflicto y la tribulación, Dios no puede olvidar a su pueblo independientemente de su desobediencia”, dijo a Episcopal News Service el Rdo. Joseph El-hag Abe Natana, director general de la Agencia Sudanesa para Desarrollo y Ayuda (SUDRA, por su sigla en inglés), al tiempo que Naciones Unidas reportaba que más de 300.000 personas sin “socorro” en el estado Unidad, a lo largo de la frontera entre el Sudán y Sudán del Sur, luego que intensos combates forzaran el retiro de las agencias internacionales de ayuda.“Dios siempre suscita expectativas con un mensaje de esperanza de que liberará a su pueblo. De aquí que la respuesta humanitaria, las oraciones y la intervención de muchas naciones en pro de la paz, tanto en el ámbito regional como internacionalmente, se vea como el cuidado, la ayuda y la intervención de Dios”, dijo Natana, sacerdote de la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán del Sur y del Sudán.Sudán del Sur se convirtió en la nación más joven del mundo en julio de 2011, cuando se separó del norte mediante un referendo sobre la independencia que siguió a casi medio siglo de guerra civil.Pero un nuevo conflicto estalló en diciembre de 2013 después que el presidente de Sudán del Sur, Salva Kiir, acusó a su ex vicepresidente Riek Machar de conspirar para dar un golpe de Estado.Aunque el conflicto comenzó a partir de una disputa política dentro del partido de gobierno, no tardó en transformarse en una guerra tribal entre los dinkas, fundamentalmente aliados de Kiir, y los nueres, partidarios de Machar, ahora un líder rebelde.Pese a varios intentos de llegar a una paz negociada entre los dos líderes, la lucha ha continuado, y más de 1,5 millones de personas permanecen internamente desplazadas y en necesidad perentoria de ayuda humanitaria.SUDRA ayuda a coordinar raciones de alimentos para las personas internamente desplazadas. Foto/SUDRA.En respuesta a la crisis actual, agencias anglicanas y agrupaciones afiliadas están ayudando a SUDRA, el brazo de ayuda y desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal del Sudán del Sur y del Sudán, a proporcionar alimento de emergencia para socorrer a las personas internamente desplazadas a través del sur, particularmente poblaciones vulnerables de niños, mujeres y ancianos. Los suministros de alimentos incluyen maíz, frijoles, aceite de cocinar, sal y otros ingredientes esenciales.La Alianza Anglicana —que conecta y fortalece las actividades de desarrollo, ayuda y promoción social de iglesias, agencias y redes de la Comunión Anglicana— reconoce a SUDRA como la agencia directriz y el asociado fundamental para la respuesta coordinada de la Iglesia al conflicto de Sudán del Sur.La Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo es una de las asociadas que ha apoyado a SUDRA por más tiempo, y continúa apoyando su labor de abordar la creciente crisis humanitaria en Sudán del Sur, especialmente en revisar las valoraciones de emergencias, en la planificación de las actividades del programa, en la preparación de informes, así como en llevar a cabo auditorías y evaluaciones.Nagulan Nesiah, encargado principal del programa para respuestas a desastres y reducción de riesgos de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, dijo que las iniciativas de la Alianza Anglicana en la movilización de todos los asociados anglicanos para respaldar un empeño coordinado “han mejorado los esfuerzos de respuesta a desastres proporcionando un modo de consolidar fondos donados por varios asociados para apoyar una estrategia abarcadora”.La Agencia Episcopal para Ayuda y Desarrollo sigue colaborando con SUDRA en el fortalecimiento de la preparación y respuesta a los riesgos de desastres. Estuvo entre otras 12 agencias anglicanas que crearon juntas el instrumento “Pastores y Desastres”, un recurso concebido para perfeccionar las iniciativas de respuesta a desastres dentro de la comunidad de ayuda y desarrollo anglicana.“La situación en Sudán del Sur sigue intensificándose”, dijo Nesiah. “la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo se siente agradecida por la asociación con SUDRA y la Alianza Anglicana mientras sigue apoyando el ministerio de atención de la Iglesia a comunidades y personas subatendidas afectadas por una crisis actual”.Natana identificó las prioridades de SUDRA como proporcionar socorro alimentario de emergencia, oración y asesoramiento, desarrollo de [una estrategia] de paz y de rehabilitación y programas de apoyo psicológico a las decenas de miles de personas internamente desplazadas. “Estas personas son menesterosas y vulnerables, necesitan ayuda humanitaria”, especialmente los niños, las mujeres y los ancianos, afirmó.Él encomió el apoyo y la labor coordinadora de la Alianza Anglicana que “le ha permitido a SUDRA resultar más eficaz a la hora de proporcionar ayuda y apoyo a personas desplazadas internamente a través de Sudán del Sur.“La asociación global es primordial porque la crisis no ha terminado”, afirmó. “Se sigue combatiendo y prosigue el desplazamiento que exige entrega de socorros, negociaciones de paz, presiones políticas y promoción a favor de un Sudán del Sur pacífico”.La Iglesia Episcopal en Estados Unidos tiene asociaciones de larga data con la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán del Sur y del Sudán a través de las relaciones de diócesis compañeras, de los programas de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, de la labor de promoción social de la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales y del apoyo y la solidaridad de la Oficina de Relaciones Globales.Las actuales relaciones de compañerismo incluyen: Albany (Nueva York) con la Provincia del Sudán; Bethlehem (Pensilvania) con Kajo Keji; Chicago con Renk; Indianápolis con Bor; Misurí con Lui; Rhode Island con Ezo; Virginia Sudoccidental con la Provincia del Sudán y Virginia con la Provincia del Sudán.También existen asociaciones a través de varias redes, tales como los Amigos Americanos de la Iglesia Episcopal del Sudán y Esperanza con Sudán del Sur.“Como hermanos y hermanas en el cuerpo de Cristo, seguimos comprometidos a respaldar al pueblo de la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán del Sur y del Sudán mientras se esfuerzan en brindarles socorro a los sufridos sudaneses del sur, al mismo tiempo que se labora por una paz con justicia”, dijo el Rdo. Ranjit K. Mathews, encargado de relaciones globales e interconexiones de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera [DFMS]. “Existen sólidas relaciones diocesanas de variada índole entre la Iglesia Episcopal y la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán del Sur y del Sudán que seguirán siendo un sitio donde se comparte la información y, más importante aún, donde se ofrecen la oración y la solidaridad”.AFRECS le está proporcionando ayuda de emergencia a varios obispos sudaneses cuyo desplazamiento de sus diócesis ha dado lugar a su relocalización, tanto dentro de Sudán del Sur como en algunos países vecinos, “lo cual les ha dejado virtualmente sin recursos para sostenerse, a ellos y sus familias, o para extender el cuidado pastoral a sus dispersas congregaciones y clero”, dijo a ENS Richard Parkins, director ejecutivo de AFRECS.Si bien la situación de seguridad en Juba, la capital de la nación, es relativamente estable, las regiones fronterizas, tales como el Alto Nilo y Kadugli, ricas en petróleo, se han visto seriamente afectadas por el conflicto, así como por los esfuerzos desestabilizadores del gobierno de Jartum en el norte.AFRECS ha estado ayudando a financiar la labor del obispo Andudu Elnail en tanto él capta y capacita pastores en la Diócesis de Kadugli “donde la gente de las montañas de Nuba sigue viviendo con temor debido a los constantes asaltos de Jartum contra el pueblo de Nuba”, dijo Parkins.Un proyecto experimental de pacificación en Bor (Alto Nilo), una región que ha experimentado algunos de los más terribles sufrimientos resultantes del conflicto intertribal, comenzará a fines de mayo. El proyecto es una colaboración entre la Alianza Anglicana, asociados de iglesias del Reino Unido y Estados Unidos y de la Comisión de Justicia, Paz y Reconciliación de la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán del Sur y del Sudán.AFRECS, juntos con otros asociados de EE.UU., también está ayudando a apoyar las iniciativas de paz y reconciliación en el campamento de refugiados de Kakuma, en Kenia, donde viven miles de refugiados que tienen las mismas identidades tribales de los que luchan entre sí en Sudán del Sur, explicó Parkins. “Estos empeños tienen por objeto poner a prueba los medios de reunir a las diversas facciones con la esperanza de que la reconciliación creada en el campamento ofrecerá un modelo para lo que podría llegar a lograrse en Sudán del Sur, donde las iniciativas de paz puedan llevarse a cabo de manera realista”, apuntó.El consejo de Iglesias de Sudán del Sur, un movimiento ecuménico que agrupa a varias denominaciones cristianas, ha presionado por tener un lugar en la mesa de negociaciones, pero sus peticiones de un cese al fuego han sido en gran medida ignoradas, siguió diciendo Parkins. Entre tanto, AFRECS y otros asociados en Estados Unidos y en el Reino Unido “siguen alentando las iniciativas de pacificación como medios de llevar esperanza a una nación cansada de guerrear, donde miles de personas están sufriendo y siendo rehenes de la intransigencia de los líderes del gobierno y de sus adversarios rebeldes”.Una consecuencia de décadas de guerra civil entre el norte y el sur seguidas por un conflicto interno alimentado por diferencias políticas” ha sido el surgimiento de una cultura de la violencia que no se ha limitado a la guerra tribal/étnica que ha afectado a tantas partes de Sudán del Sur, sino que resulta en expresiones violentas de venganza y represalia entre otras tribus y subtribus”, añadió. “Esta proliferación de la violencia podría frustrar seriamente el futuro de las iniciativas de pacificación. Esta situación hace que el fin del conflicto sea aun más urgente”.— Matthew Davies es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Iglesias coordinan campaña de socorro en el dilatado conflicto de Sudán del Sur The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Sudan & South Sudan Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Por Matthew DaviesPosted May 26, 2015 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

Diocese of Dallas notified of successful canonical consent process

first_img Comments are closed. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Diocese of Dallas notified of successful canonical consent process Bishop-elect Sumner ordination and consecration on Nov. 14 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Tags Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Edward Willey III says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY September 27, 2015 at 1:49 am LGBT Episcopalians here in Dallas, along with their allies, friends, and family, sincerely hope that future Bishop Sumner will consider seriously the issues surrounding the inclusion of LGBT persons in this diocese. Up to this point, the diocese has talked about us – not to us. In Sumner’s letter following the authorization of same-sex marriage rites at the Convention, we were told that the diocese’s refusal to follow the principles laid down in the Resolution is a “gift” to the Church. This did not sit well with us. Franky, it felt like an insult. In any given parish in this diocese, gays and lesbians are singing in choirs, serving as acolytes, helping to manage parish affairs, teaching classes, and more. Yet, we are being talked about – not engaged in a dialogue. For many years, LGBT members of this diocese have been largely silent. No more. These issues have reached critical mass. On September 20 a group of us calling ourselves Dallas Episcopalians for Unity (including allies, not just LGBT) mailed a letter to the Diocese of Dallas, copying the leadership of TEC and the diocesan Bishops and Standing Committees of all the other dioceses of this church. As far as I am aware as of this moment, a response has not been received from the Diocese of Dallas. You may read our letter here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7gGn92E_p9SM3RsOWphUFdyU1U/view [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Registrar of General Convention, the Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe, have notified the Diocese of  Dallas that Bishop-Elect George Sumner has received the required majority of consents in the canonical consent process.The Rev. George Robinson Sumner, Jr., was elected Bishop on May 16.  His ordination and consecration service is slated for November 14.While Bishop-Elect Sumner has received the necessary majority of consents, consents will continue to be accepted up to and including October 10 deadline date.In Canon III.11.4 (b), Standing Committees, in consenting to the ordination and consecration, attest they are “fully sensible of how important it is that the Sacred Order and Office of a Bishop should not be unworthily conferred, and firmly persuaded that it is our duty to bear testimony on this solemn occasion without partiality, do, in the presence of Almighty God, testify that we know of no impediment on account of which the Reverend A.B. ought not to be ordained to that Holy Office. We do, moreover, jointly and severally declare that we believe the Reverend A.B. to have been duly and lawfully elected and to be of such sufficiency in learning, of such soundness in the Faith, and of such godly character as to be able to exercise the Office of a Bishop to the honor of God and the edifying of the Church, and to be a wholesome example to the flock of Christ.” Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (1) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Sep 15, 2015 Bishop Elections, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Video: Lambeth’s young monastic community hailed a major success

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal News Service] Forming a monastic community of young adults at Lambeth Palace to embrace a yearlong commitment to prayer, study and service may have been an audacious experiment, but members of its first class say the initiative has been a major triumph and an extraordinary life-changing experience.“It’s been grounding, deeply rewarding,” says the Rev. Shannon Preston, one of two Episcopalians who joined the Community of St. Anselm for its first “year in God’s time” last September. “Because we have the opportunity to wake up every day and pray – that’s our priority – there’s no excuses of why Christ is not at the center of my life or the lives of the people around me.”Preston, 27, an Episcopal priest and graduate of Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, said there’s a constant reminder that the community members have chosen to love and to live with one another. “Living with people from around the world who are excited and exploring, who recognize that there is an endless mystery to learn from and grow into and serve, is so valuable,” said Preston, who also is assisting at St. Luke’s Church in Peckham, London.Lay Episcopalian Peter Angelica said that he’s “learned a lot about how to listen – not so much listening to people but listening with people to see … what God is saying through them. It has been a really fruitful journey.”A former investment banker from New York, Angelica, 24, didn’t realize how much the experience was going to transform him. Six months in, he already has recognized changes in his personality and “the ways I’m thinking, new habits I am forming and old habits I’m letting go of. It’s been incredible.”Central to the community’s ethos and pattern of life “is to pursue likeness of Christ and welcome his transforming touch above and beyond any thought, attitude, doctrine or value that we might hold dear,” the Rev. Anders Litzell, an Anglican priest from Sweden who is prior of the community, told Episcopal News Service following a recent service of Holy Eucharist at Lambeth Palace. “It’s a radical, sacrificial commitment to the likeness of Christ.”The community was formed in September 2015 when Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby opened up Lambeth Palace to 16 adults aged 20-35 to spend a year together as a radical new Christian community.The 16 residential members from around the world are joined by 20 nonresidential members who live and work in London. They all go on the same formational journey of prayer, study and service to the poor, but the nonresidential members live it out in their home, work and social environments.“In many ways, what [the nonresidential members] are experiencing now, the residents will experience when this year ends,” says Litzell. “So the cross-pollination between these two very different ways of doing the same thing, I think, is going to be richly rewarding within this community and hopefully across the wider church as well.”In addition to prayer and community, service is also a key element of the Community of St. Anselm, with all members spending about a third of their time with local charities and agencies serving the disadvantaged, the marginalized and the poor throughout London.The community follows “the Franciscan insight that becoming more like Jesus is inseparable from serving others, especially the poorest in society,” according to its website.Ministries include volunteering with local food banks, hospitals, refugee shelters, schools and homeless ministries.Through their commitment to study, the community welcomes a range of speakers from a variety of contexts who bring their knowledge and expertise on topics related to theology and ethics.“What is central to the community is that the spirit is in it, the spirit is giving birth to a new way of doing something old, a new way of engaging with Christ through prayer, through going deeper into the Scriptures, through serving the poor and most vulnerable in society, and doing this not as a solitary endeavor, but in a deeper intimacy of relationship between people,” said Litzell.Ordained in the Church of England in 2012, Litzell’s path to the priesthood began some years earlier during his undergraduate studies at Wheaton College, outside Chicago, where he discovered “high church” Anglicanism through St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in nearby Glen Ellyn, Illinois. Litzell also has served parishes in the Diocese of Natal in South Africa and in the Diocese of London.Preston said that there are so many pressures in the world “that we constantly have to be busy … so for me, stepping away into a more monastic lifestyle has made me look differently at what it is to live in the world, but that there’s a rhythm underlying all of that. … Community makes me a better person; it makes me consider other people and suddenly my own views are not the final word.“Having a schedule that’s built around prayer and having that be the first and most important part of my life continually brings me back to God as the center of what we’re doing. … It’s been clear in this year that the Holy Spirit is doing something extraordinary.”To find out more, visit: stanselm.org.uk– Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector Smithfield, NC By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 29, 2016 Seamus P.Doyle says: Martha Knight says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (6) Canon Kale Francis King Tssf says: Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Verna Hurley says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service March 30, 2016 at 3:17 pm What is exciting is that these are young folks. What they will become . . . in a large sense . . . is what Third Order Christians are now. All of those pressures they are experiencing . . . and those the non-resident members share with them . . . all compare to the Prayer, Study, Work ways the Tertiaries are now engaged in in their world-wide fellowship. Humility, Love Joy are at the center of a Tertiary’s life as they (1) Make our Lord known and loved everywhere (2) Spread the spirit of love and harmony (3) Live simply. Now, THAT seems to me is right where these wonderful young folks will be in time.I hope Tertiaries who can personally meet any of these mighty special people will be affected by their joy and manner.As for bishops being interested in incorporating the Order in their jurisdictions, I must admit I am rather Jaundiced. I’m not sure that they can see the value of encouraging ANY Order in their jurisdiction. For one thing, for a good number of Ordinaries, Orders “smell” of a style of Churchmanship that does not match their style.Generally, there is a great effort to be “Martha’s”: the place for the “Mary” can’t be seen.In all this, perhaps someone else can present a more positive view. March 29, 2016 at 7:26 pm As an Third Order Episcopal tertiary I find this so exciting! March 31, 2016 at 8:41 am Refreshing!! The love of God knows no bounds and is alive and well in the hearts and minds of these dedicated folks. This is the best kind of contagious. It reminds me of the vows I took twenty-two years ago when I became a member of the “Order” of the Daughters of the King; to pray, to serve and to evangelize for the spread of Christ’s kingdom.I say “praise God and let the Spirit out in the world that we may walk in love as Christ loves us.” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Video: Lambeth’s young monastic community hailed a major success New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest March 30, 2016 at 6:05 pm I am so glad for this wonderful success of prayer, study, service by Archbishop Welby and the members of the Community of St. Anselm. I am a spiritual director and a professed member of the Community of the Gospel, one of the non-residential religious communities of the Episcopal Church in the United States. The Community of St. Anselm, our own Community of the Gospel and other expressions of monastic intentionality point to a deep spiritual hunger and a desire to find new ways to live and pray in community. It may be that the renewal of the church grows out of these spiritual and communal expressions, as the renewal of the church has often been informed by monastic practice. I am especially glad that in the United States the traditional orders and the non-residential communities are collaborating and meeting together. So much promise in all of this! Br. Daniel-Chad Hoffman, CG says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Anglican Communion, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Rector Belleville, IL March 30, 2016 at 1:08 pm I hope other bishops are open to initiate a similar program in their dioceses. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Seamus P.Doyle says: Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events March 30, 2016 at 1:08 pm I hope other bishops are open to initiate a similar program in their dioceses. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Video last_img read more

Primus of Scottish Episcopal Church announces his retirement

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Anglican Communion, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Anglican Communion News Service] The Most Rev David Chillingworth, primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, has announced he will retire at the end of July. Bishop David was consecrated as Bishop of St. Andrews, Dunkeld & Dunblane in 2005 and was elected primus four years later.Full article. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Rector Bath, NC center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Feb 9, 2017 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Primus of Scottish Episcopal Church announces his retirement Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA People Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

New York: On Charlottesville

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Racial Justice & Reconciliation Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted Aug 15, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New York: On Charlottesville This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of New York]Tuesday, August 15, 2017My Brothers and Sisters,The events of this last weekend in Charlottesville have horrified Americans across our country.  The virulence of the “Unite the Right” demonstrations themselves, with the viciousness of language and symbol, was in itself profoundly troubling and dangerous; but when it became the occasion for an instance of domestic terrorism, in which one woman lost her life and dozens of others were injured, we saw Charlottesville hold a mirror before America and reflect back to us an image that covers us in shame.  All people of good will, and our leaders, have decried the violence and the loss of life, even as many have struggled to come to terms with the dark ideologies that were the foundation for these demonstrations.When I wrote the draft of this letter yesterday, our president had not yet made his second public statement regarding Charlottesville, so that when that statement came I was gratified, as we all were, that he had finally named the evil of racism and called out the far-right groups and ideologies whose hate-based philosophies led to the events of Charlottesville and which have been a cancerous current running through American life and history from our beginning.  He joined the countless others who in these days have insisted that these hate groups have no part in American discourse, that racism is an affront to Gospel and nation, and that the violent, rage-filled rhetoric of the Ku Klux Klan and the Nazis and the Alt-Right are a destructive force that will, if unchecked, undermine the foundation of our common life.The president’s voice was all the more necessary and needed because too many of the white nationalist players in Charlottesville, including David Duke, have invoked the name of the President of the United States to give permission and justification for the white power rally, and to claim him as their champion.  Indeed, his campaign signs were carried in Charlottesville alongside the poisonous claims of the Klan and the Nazis and those extolling racial hatred.  Too often the rhetoric of the presidential campaign last year allowed this far right radical fringe to believe that Mr. Trump held, or endorsed, or at least accepted as legitimate, the same virulent ideologies.  So that while it is with outrage and sorrow that we watched the events of Charlottesville, it was for a great many people no surprise.  We are living in a time when the worst and most hateful racist impulses of people have been emboldened – and so emboldened, will relentlessly seek to push us as a people, and as a constitutional democracy pledged to the equality and inclusion of all people, to our breaking point.  For the president to continue in his office with credibility as a domestic leader, he must not only distance himself from these forces, but put the full weight and voice of his office and his own character into the repudiation of white nationalism and racial hatred.  It is incumbent on every one of us to pray that he and we will come to full understanding of the historic and dangerous hour to which we have come, and rise to the high calling which this hour demands.  Those forces which we may in truth say are fashioned of evil itself, and which claimed their day in Charlottesville, may not stand.  We must counter with everything we have.And yet, history lays traps for everyone.  The danger for all of us who oppose these racist movements is that when we see the kind of ugly displays that we saw in Charlottesville this weekend we can imagine that racism is their problem, and slide past our own complicity and involvement in the larger patterns of racism – in America and, it must be said, in the Church – which do not wear hoods or raise swastikas and where that complicity and involvement is therefore more insidious, harder to see and know, and therefore harder to root out.It is not simply the Ku Klux Klan and the Nazis and the Alt-Right which we must fight, but the white supremacy which undergirds racism itself.  We must never cease to make our deep exploration into the conscious and unconscious patterns of privilege which continue to give unearned rewards and opportunities to white people, while relegating people of color to a lower place and lesser opportunity and unheard voice, and the oppressive burdens of poverty and imprisonment and trampled dreams.  Even as we never falter in our protest against the extremism of the racist radical right, we must recognize that that deeper struggle belongs to those on both sides of the line of skirmish, and must finally call all Americans to self-examination, to the repentance that follows true self-knowledge, and to a common commitment to amendment of life and to a renewed covenant.  The way we do that as Christians is through baptism, and then through the costs and sacrifices of the baptismal life.I am gratified to live my life in the Diocese of New York among thousands of believing people who are together committed to overcoming the racism which is still in our midst, overcoming prejudice against the LGBT community, overcoming the barriers to opportunity for women, overcoming rejection of the immigrant and de-legitimizing of those of other faiths.  All of this is hard work, and it is not at all finished.  But I am convinced that it begins with the overcoming of our own hearts and wills, and the humble self-offering that we make before our God and our Christ in baptism and our acceptance of Christian responsibility.  If there is a lesson to be taken from Charlottesville, it is not that evil is simply out there in the world – we knew that – but that the battle is longer than we thought it would be, it is harder than we imagined, and it begins in the human heart.Every time we bring a new Christian to the font for baptism the whole community is invited to renew our own baptismal vows and covenant.  That we may remember who we are and whose we are.  Sometimes we slide through the questions of baptism so quickly that I fear we have little time to contemplate the mighty words we are saying, the weight of the promises we are making.  Even before we affirm our Christ, this:  Do you renounce Satan, and all the forces of wickedness which rebel against God?  Do you renounce the evil powers of this world which corrupt and destroy the creatures of God?  Do you renounce all sinful desires that draw you from the love of God?There it is.  The evil that besets us from without and the evil that festers within.With the questions hanging in the air, I look about me at a broken and strife-torn world, I see the failures of community, the hatred and violence that lays waste to everything it touches, I see the suffering of people, I see the sickness within my country and my church, and when I am brave enough to look, within my own self.  And because I love Jesus, because I love my brothers and sisters – all of you – and because God help me I want to be a Christian, I can say – I will say – though broken-hearted:  Yes.  I renounce them.With every good wish, I remainYours,The Rt. Rev. Andrew ML DietscheBishop of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Charlottesville, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

Brian Lee Cole ordained and consecrated as fifth bishop of…

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Dec 5, 2017 Bishops lay hands on the Rt. Rev. Brian Cole to ordain and consecrate him Dec. 2 as the new bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee at Church of the Ascension in Knoxville, Tenn. Photo: Ed Barels[Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee] The Rt. Rev. Brian Lee Cole was ordained and consecrated as the fifth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee on Dec. 2 at Church of the Ascension in Knoxville, Tennessee.Three former bishops of the diocese participated in the service: the Rt. Rev. William E. Sanders, first and founding bishop; the Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg, third bishop; and the Rt. Rev. George D. Young, fourth bishop. The Rt. Rev. Robert Gould Tharp, second bishop of the diocese died in 2003.During the course of the service,  Cole received gifts from friends, churches at which he previously served, and the Very Rev. John Ross, dean of St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Knoxville, Tennessee. The gifts included a pectoral cross, bishop’s ring, mitre and crozier. The bishop’s family participated in the service. Son, Jess Cole, served as a lector, and Cole’s wife, Susan Weatherford, played the recorder during communion.Around 1,000 people attended the ordination and consecration service, and more than 6,700 participated by live stream. The entire service may be viewed on the diocesan website here.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, led the service as chief consecrator. The Rev. Dr. Lauren Winner, author, and associate professor of Christian Spirituality at Duke Divinity School, was the preacher.Cole was seated in the cathedra, or bishop’s chair symbolic of the bishop’s office, in a service at St. John’s Cathedral in Knoxville on Dec. 3.He was elected July 28 on the fifth ballot out of a field of five nominees. He succeeds Young, who served the diocese from 2011 to 2017. Cole served as the rector at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Lexington, Kentucky, from 2012 until his election as bishop.Previously, he served as sub-dean at the Cathedral of All Souls in Asheville for seven years, and as vicar at Church of the Advocate, a worshiping community for homeless in downtown Asheville, for 3 years. He received a Master of Divinity from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, with additional studies in Anglican church history in 2001. His Bachelor of Science is in Business Administration, received in 1989 from Murray State University in Murray, Kentucky.Cole has served on the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church, and has five times been a featured preacher on the popular multi-denominational Day 1 weekly podcast/radio broadcast. Cole taught in the religion department at Warren Wilson College, Swannanoa, North Carolina, Wake Forest University School of Divinity in Winston Salem, North Carolina,, and Luther Seminary, St, Paul., Minnesota. He served on the program staff of the Appalachian Ministries Educational Resource Center (AMERC) in Berea, Kentucky, for seven years before his ordination as a priest.The Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee is approximately 14,350 square miles in area, comprising 34 counties in East Tennessee and three counties in North Georgia with the Cumberland Plateau as the western border. There are 50 congregations and worshiping communities servicing nearly 16,000 active members. The population of the diocese is concentrated in the major metropolitan areas: Chattanooga, Knoxville and the Tri-Cities area, which includes Kingsport, Bristol and Johnson City, areas totaling more than 2.4 million people according to Tennessee state government statistics. Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC House of Bishops, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI People Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Brian Lee Cole ordained and consecrated as fifth bishop of East Tennessee Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Consecrations, Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

Tres obispos proponen una solución para el acceso pleno a…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY General Convention, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tres obispos proponen una solución para el acceso pleno a los ritos matrimoniales de parejas del mismo sexo Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET General Convention 2018, Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 2, 2018 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 House of Bishops, “Medios litúrgicos 1: Te bendeciré y serás una bendición”, fue uno de los ritos que la Convención General autorizó en 2015 para uso experimental. Foto de Church Publishing Inc.[Episcopal News Service] Tres obispos han propuesto una resolución sobre el matrimonio [de parejas] del mismo sexo que “busca garantizar que todo el pueblo de Dios tenga acceso a todas las liturgias matrimoniales de la Iglesia, independientemente de la diócesis, si bien respetando la dirección pastoral y la conciencia del obispo local”.Lawrence Provenzano, obispo de Long Island; Dorsey McConnell, obispo de  Pittsburgh  y Nicholas Knisely , obispo de Rhode Island dijeron en un comunicado de prensa en las últimas horas del 28 de junio que su Resolución B012 es “un intento de hacer avanzar la Iglesia en una atmósfera de respeto mutuo, reconciliación y el amor de Jesucristo”.La resolución sigue autorizando los dos ritos matrimoniales de uso experimental aprobados por la reunión de la Convención General en 2015 sin límite de tiempo y sin procurar una revisión del Libro de Oración Común de 1979.“Dado nuestro particular momento en la historia, esta resolución ofrece una manera de progresar para toda la Iglesia sin la posible interrupción de un ministerio que podría provocar la propuesta revisión del Libro de Oración Común”, dijeron los tres obispos.La Resolución B012 propone que en todas las diócesis se facilite el acceso a las liturgias, sin que requiera el permiso del obispo diocesano. En lugar de eso, las congregaciones que quieran usar los ritos, pero cuyos obispos  hayan rehusado la autorización, pueden solicitar y recibirán una Supervisión Pastoral Episcopal Delegada (DEPO) de otro obispo de la Iglesia que facilitaría el acceso a las liturgias. La DEPO es un mecanismo concebido por la Cámara de Obispos hace 14 años para congregaciones que discrepen con sus obispos diocesanos en materia de sexualidad humana y otros asuntos teológicos.El acceso a los sitos ha sido un punto de fricción desde el comienzo en un pequeño número de diócesis.La Convención General en 2015 autorizó los dos ritos matrimoniales para uso experimental (Resolución A054) tanto para parejas del mismo sexo como de sexos opuestos. Los obispos y los diputados también hicieron la definición canónica (mediante la Resolución A036) del género neutro del matrimonio.El Equipo de Trabajo para el Estudio del Matrimonio dijo en su Informe del Libro Azul haber encontrado una amplia aceptación del rito a través de la Iglesia, excepto que ocho obispos diocesanos, de las 101 diócesis nacionales, no habían autorizado su uso.El equipo de trabajo propone (por vía de la Resolución A085) que la Convención exija a todos los obispos con jurisdicción que “tomen medidas para que todas las parejas que soliciten casarse en esta Iglesia tengan un acceso razonable y conveniente a estos ritos experimentales”. La Convención también tendrá que decir que los obispos “continuarán la labor de dirigir a la Iglesia en una participación integral con estos materiales  y seguirán proporcionando una generosa respuesta pastoral que cubra las necesidades de los miembros de esta Iglesia”.Los episcopales que apoyan ese empeño han estado activos antes de la Convención. Demandando la bendición [Claiming the Blessing], [organización] que se creó en 2002 para abogar por la “plena inclusión de todos los bautizados en todos los sacramentos de la Iglesia”, según aparece en su cibersitio, ha publicado un texto de promoción o apoyo. Algunos episcopales de la Diócesis de Dallas han creado una página web llamada Querida Convención General [Dear General Convention] que incluye vídeos y testimonios escritos acerca de personas que no pueden casarse en esa diócesis.La  Resolución A085 del equipo de trabajo también pide la adición de las liturgias de uso experimental al Libro de Oración Común. Y propone cambios a otros ritos matrimoniales, así como a prefacios y secciones del Catecismo del libro de oración para adoptar un lenguaje de género neutro.La Iglesia Episcopal incluye 10 diócesis en jurisdicciones civiles fuera de Estados Unidos que no permiten el matrimonio de parejas del mismo sexo. Puesto que los Cánones de la Iglesia exigen acatamiento tanto a los requisitos civiles como canónicos para el matrimonio, la Convención de 2015 no autorizó el uso de liturgias experimentales en esas diócesis.Cinco obispos diocesanos y uno jubilado de la IX Provincia, en representación de las diócesis de Ecuador Litoral, Ecuador Central, República Dominicana, Venezuela y Honduras le han advertido al equipo de trabajo que si la Convención adopta cambios acerca del matrimonio que los obligaran “a la aceptación de prácticas sociales y culturales que no tienen base bíblica ni aceptación en la adoración cristiana”, esos cambios estarían “ahondando mucho más la brecha, la división, y la Novena Provincia tendrá que aprender a caminar sola”. Los obispos de Colombia y Puerto Rico no firmaron la declaración.Para abordar sus preocupaciones, la Resolución B012 también pide la creación de un Equipo de Trabajo sobre la Comunión frente a la Diferencia, “encargado de encontrar una senda duradera para todos los episcopales en una sola Iglesia, sin retroceder a la clara decisión de la Convención de extender el matrimonio a todas las parejas, y su firme compromiso de proporcionarles acceso a todas las parejas que buscan casarse en esta Iglesia”, dice el comunicado de prensa de los tres obispos. El equipo de trabajo buscará una vía coherente con la normativa de la Iglesia y la declaración de la Cámara de Obispos ““Comunión frente a la Diferencia” en 2015, que dio lugar a que varios obispos objetaran las decisiones de la Convención sobre el matrimonio.Siete obispos, cinco de los cuales rehusaron autorizar los ritos y dos de los cinco que firmaron la declaración de la IX Provincia, dijeron el 28 de junio que acatarían la Resolución B012 si era aprobada.“De aprobarse la propuesta que tenemos ante nosotros, confiaríamos en caridad las congregaciones que no lean la Sagrada Escritura de esta manera al cuidado de otros obispos en la Iglesia Episcopal con quienes nos mantenemos unidos en el bautismo”, escribieron. “Si bien no podemos respaldar todos los aspectos de esta propuesta, agradeceríamos si nos ayuda a seguir contendiendo unos con otros por la verdad [y] en amor dentro de un solo cuerpo”.Provenzano, McConnell y Knisely encomiaron esa promesa. Dijeron, además, “puesto que los Cánones de la Iglesia dicen que la Convención General puede fijar normas y condiciones para ritos de uso experimental, las normas y condiciones que se especifican en esta resolución tienen por extensión fuerza canónica. Todos los obispos están obligados a aceptar esas normas y condiciones, conforme al derecho canónico. Creemos que ellos las defenderán si las impugnan”.Los obispos proponentes afirman en su comunicado de prensa que su propuesta “les permite a los conservadores florecer dentro de las estructuras de la Iglesia Episcopal, pero no a expensas de congregaciones progresistas en diócesis conservadoras. Si bien a primera vista puede sonar innecesariamente complejo, es una ‘vía intermedia’que les da sitio a todos en una misma Iglesia”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora principal y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Marriage Equality, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Same-Sex Marriage Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

National Cathedral hosts forum on COVID-19 with Fauci, other top…

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Adelle M. BanksPosted Nov 17, 2020 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET COVID-19 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Dr. Fauci speaks with a group of people at the Ignatius Forum at the Washington National Cathedral on Nov. 12. Photo: Danielle E. Thomas/Washington National Cathedral[Religion News Service] Beneath the neo-Gothic arches of Washington National Cathedral, Dr. Anthony Fauci mulled over the question everyone is asking: Should families gather for Thanksgiving during the coronavirus pandemic?“I think every family unit needs to do a risk assessment,” said the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at a Nov. 12 forum.He said families should consider factors such as the age, underlying conditions, travel, testing and quarantining of people who wish to dine together on the holiday.“You may want to make a decision that you’re just going to forestall it — now whenever I say that I’m the grinch that stole Thanksgiving,” he said. “I’m not saying that. I’m saying everyone needs to seriously think about the risk-benefit” ratio.“You might say,” the infectious disease expert added, “I had a wonderful Thanksgiving last year. I’m looking forward to a wonderful Thanksgiving next year. But maybe right now is not the time to have 25 people in a house when you take your mask off as you’re eating.”The advice, from the man President Trump has threatened with firing and Joe Biden said he would hire if elected, came as the country has reached record numbers of daily confirmed COVID-19 cases. Fauci said he’s focused on public health and science — including the current promise of a vaccine — not politics.“When you hear those things in the newspapers, many people think I get shook back and forth by that,” said Fauci to his moderator, Adi Ignatius, editor in chief of Harvard Business Review. “To be honest with you, I don’t.”Fauci was followed by National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins and Dr. Luciana Borio, a member of Biden’s new coronavirus task force. The Ignatius Forum is an annual event at the cathedral that seeks expert opinions on pressing issues. Amy L. Ignatius, a New Hampshire Superior Court judge, moderated the discussion with Collins and Borio at the forum honoring her parents, cathedral benefactors.The forum was attended virtually by more than 7,000 registrants and by about 10 staffers and Ignatius family members who were at the cathedral in person, said Kevin Eckstrom, the National Cathedral’s chief communications officer.One question posed to Collins during the event was whether outcomes may be better for COVID-19 patients for whom faith is important in their lives. The NIH director said that would be a good research subject to pursue.“In other circumstances, yeah, there is evidence that people who have a spiritual part of their daily life seem to have more resilience when it comes to health issues and other things,” he said. “It’s not a huge effect, but it’s certainly in there.”Collins, who created BioLogos, an organization that fosters dialogue about Christianity and science, pointed to National Cathedral Dean Randy Hollerith’s earlier reference to Psalm 46 — which says, “God is our refuge and strength” — as a passage he personally considers to be a “great source of comfort.”Collins also noted that he and his colleagues have been barraged with questions as people wonder what to do about holiday gatherings.“I’m not going to have Thanksgiving with my family this year because of people in the family who are at risk, and I’m going to miss that — first time in 27 years there has not been a gathering of 30 or so people around the table,” said Collins. “When you put all the evidence together, we can get by this year without that.”He added: “We’re going to get through a serious worldwide crisis, and it will have an end.” Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET National Cathedral hosts forum on COVID-19 with Fauci, other top health officials Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more