‘Sloppy’ hockey is the name of the game early in NHL season

first_imgNo exhibition games and for some teams no action at all for 10 months has made for a sloppy start to the NHL season. It’s plenty entertaining with all the odd-man rushes and goals, even if the hockey resembles junior or college games more than the pros. Teams have shuffled their lineups more early because of injuries and protocols. That has led to less continuity and more mistakes and penalties all over the ice. But goaltenders have also stepped up and shaken off the rust quicker to keep from every game being an offensive explosion.last_img

Trump’s cybersecurity order: Credit union, bank leadership react

first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Three financial services trade organizations had mixed reactions to an executive order, signed by President Trump last week, that calls for a massive review of cybersecurity efforts in government agencies, requires agencies to use one set of cybersecurity risk-management standards and holds agency heads accountable for protecting data. ­­Within the next 90 days, heads of executive departments and agencies must provide risk-management reports — some of which may be classified — to Homeland Security and the Office of Management and Budget detailing how they manage cyber-risks, what changes they plan to make, and what cybersecurity risks they’re willing to accept.According to the order, agencies must also adopt the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, first issued in 2014, to manage cybersecurity risk.“The executive branch has for too long accepted antiquated and difficult–to-defend IT,” the order said.last_img read more

How the other half live: Roadtesting one of Brisbane’s most iconic riverfront mansions

first_imgA grand staircase leads to the upper level.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus12 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market12 hours agoBack in the main house, I climb the magnificent staircase to discover four bedrooms, including the master suite, which happens to be mine for the next 48 hours.It also happens to be almost as big as my entire house. Padding my way through the bedroom on plush carpet, I make way into the luxurious marble ensuite where a giant spa bath awaits.I should mention I had buyer’s remorse for about six months after we bought our humble worker’s cottage and compromised on the one thing I now miss daily — a bath tub. So, perhaps not surprisingly, I was in that tub in no time. I have to crane my neck to look at the soaring ceilings decorated with intricate roses and a huge French chandelier.To my right is the grandest ‘Gone with the Wind’-style staircase I’ve ever seen and there is nothing but marble beneath my feet. The formal sitting room. Picture: Realestate.com.au.I suddenly feel very underdressed. But the view is beckoning, so out to the timber decks I go to take in the cool breeze and stunning vista. The University of Queensland is directly in front of me and to my right and left, the winding river stretches as far as the eye can see.I sit here for a while, captivated by this scene and inspecting the ornate, powder-coated aluminium lattice that adorns the veranda balustrades.It strikes me that although I am only minutes from the city centre, there is nothing but peace and quiet.I could definitely get used to this. Is it too early to open the bottle of bubbles I’ve brought with me? This magnificent house at 50 Dauphin Tce, Highgate Hill, is on the market. Picture: Realestate.com.au. The property is just as impressive in the day time.It’s not yet midday, so I refrain and instead make my way to the other side of the house where there is a much more ‘lived in’ living, dining and kitchen area.It’s clear this is where the owners spend most of their time. The circular, granite kitchen is practical and neat, with a huge island bench and plenty of storage. MORE: Agent puts money where mouth is I warm myself by another fireplace in this large, open-plan area with its polished, hardwood floors (made of timber from the old Brett’s Wharf no less) — all while admiring a glass atrium framing the rainforest outside.It is through this wall that I spot what the owners call ‘the treehouse’ — a separate, self-contained guesthouse spanning two levels joined to the main house by a large deck.A quick look inside takes me back to childhood, playing in a cubby house in the trees; except my cubby house didn’t have its own kitchen, bathroom, balcony and bedroom. The house is imposing when viewed from below.Brisbane really is at its best when seen from the river. As we glide along, we pass the homes of many of the city’s highest profile residents.Among them, former Olympic swimmer Susie O’Neill’s riverfront home and developer Mark Stockwell’s palatial residence.So, this is how the other half live. The river views from the home’s wide verandas.But believe it or not, the house is only two decades old — despite its period features and the fact it looks like it’s straight out of the Great Gatsby era.“It’s the kind of house Walt Disney would have built if you asked him to build a Queenslander,” owner Dr Chris Bradshaw tells me.“It’s like living in a luxury resort every day.”The history of the site weighs on me as I contemplate what to do with my time.I don’t even know where to start, so I turn right and find myself in a ballroom-sized, formal lounge and dining room, complete with a grand piano, marble fireplace, antique furniture and drapes I’m told are worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. The view from one of the verandas. Picture: Realestate.com.au.An hour or so later, it was time to pop that bubbly and watch the sky change colour as dusk turned to dark. What better way to do that than from my very own observatory tower?That’s right, a few steps outside the master suite lead me to an actual, five-storey tower, with a spiral staircase leading to the highest point of the house, from which the domed roof opens up to reveal the night sky and a view that would make even the most avid stargazer jealous.It’s impossible not to feel like a princess up here — or perhaps, Rapunzel. Let your imagination run wild … The view from the observatory tower.Before I know it, we’re back at ‘Nareke’, and alas, my time here is up. I write about a lot of dream homes, but to actually live the dream for a weekend is something else.With the banking royal commission and uncertainty around the federal election outcome behind us, Brisbane’s prestige property market is in a sweet spot.Agents say buyers have a renewed sense of urgency to act now, but top quality properties are few and far between.50 Dauphin Terrace is one of those properties. center_img The home comes with its observatory tower. Surrounded by its own private rainforest, with not a neighbour in sight, the house sits on nearly 4000 sqm of absolute riverfront land, only 2km from the CBD.This site was once the home of General Douglas McArthur, who was a highly decorate soldier of both world wars, during the Pacific Campaign in World War 2. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:21Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenImagine spending a weekend in this dream home!02:22 A peek through to the master bedroom of the house.Skipping down the paved, winding paths, through manicured gardens, I find myself at the boat house, which is kitted out with kayaks.A private pontoon is below me, next to a remote-controlled boat lift (the only one of its kind on the Brisbane River the Bradshaws tell me).Looking above from this viewpoint, the house is truly breathtaking.The Bradshaws are waiting for me on the boat, so off we go. The view from the river of 50 Dauphin Tce, Highgate Hill.This is my home for the next two days — 50 Dauphin Terrace, Highgate Hill — a three-storey, seven-bedroom, four-bathroom Victorian-style mansion perched high on a hill overlooking the Brisbane River. The entrance to 50 Dauphin Tce, Highgate Hill. Picture: Realestate.com.au.As I walk away from the house, along the paved winding path flanked by manicured gardens, I realise this truly is one of Brisbane’s best kept secrets. Driving out of the regal gates in my humble Honda hatchback — in desperate need of a wash — reality hits and I realise the fairytale is abruptly over.‘Nareke’ at 50 Dauphin Tce, Highgate Hill, is for sale by negotiation through Christine Rudolph and Matt Lancashire of Ray White – New Farm. The property comes with a 23m gas heated pool.When I wake up the next morning, I’m in an unbelievably comfy bed; refreshed and ready to explore some more. Downstairs, I discover a completely separate apartment with a brand new kitchen, living room, two bedrooms, a bathroom, a laundry and a 2000-bottle, temperature-controlled wine cellar. Now I know the owners weren’t joking when they said they needed to call each other on their mobiles to find out where they were because the house was so big!The apartment opens out to a large timber deck and a 23m gas-heated swimming pool, overlooking the river. I’m tempted to take a dip, but it’s such a nice day, why not take the boat out? Courier-Mail journalist Elizabeth Tilley was given the keys to one of Brisbane’s most iconic mansions for a weekend. Picture: Peter Wallis.AS I walk through the front door, I can’t help but detect a certain swagger in my step.So, this is what it’s like to feel a million bucks.I’ve been given the keys to one of Brisbane’s most iconic, riverfront mansions for the weekend — and I plan to make the most of it.What first hits me as I enter the home is the sheer size of the place. RELATED: Inside look at Coast’s $7m homelast_img read more

At National Symposium on Liberia’s Symbols, Sis Mary Laurene Brown to Deliver Keynote Address

first_imgOrganizers of the upcoming national symposium on Liberia’s symbols and national awards have selected renowned Catholic Sister Mary Laurene Browne to deliver the keynote address.The event is scheduled for Friday, June 6, 2014 at the Paynesville Town Hall, outside Monrovia. The Friday symposium is the first activity aimed at bringing people together to discuss the essence of the national awards project—the symbols and the possibilities for review. The symposium will be held on the theme, “Reviewing Liberia’s National Symbols to Renew National Identity,” and is expected to bring together Liberians from all walks of life including, women groups, the media, academia and others. Other speakers will include the South African Ambassador to Liberia, Masilo E. Mabeta, Liberia’s Ambassador to Senegal, Brahima Kaba as well as the chairperson of the History Department at the University of Liberia, Dr. William E. Allen, and former Associate Justice and current chairperson of the International Human Rights Commission, Cllr. Gladys Johnson. The one-day symposium, according to a statement, will set the stage for the review of Liberia’s national symbols and awards. Since the 1970’s, Liberians have been calling for changes in the national symbols and awards to reflect the historical realities of the citizenry. It has been argued that the current symbols and awards do not represent the cultural breadth and historical depth of Liberians.   In 1974, President William R. Tolbert Jr., through an Act of Legislature, established a commission to review the Liberian Constitution, national symbols, motto and anthem. The commission was headed by the then Minister of Postal Affairs, Mckinley Deshield and 50 other representatives from the existing counties. The commission concluded that Liberians did not need major changes in the symbols, but suggested changes in the motto and wordings of the seal, which were never done up to present. The report on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), referred to some national symbols as divisive and indicated they were partly responsible for the conflict in the country. The TRC-sponsored National Conference, in its Declaration, recommended among other things, a review of the national symbols and awards. Liberia’s 15-year development plan, the “Agenda for Transformation and the broader National Vision 2030 Initiative also recommend in their lists of priorities on peace and reconciliation sector interventions, “The establishment of a forum of Liberians of diverse backgrounds to discuss issues of national history, symbols and identity and reconciliation.” In reaction to this, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf on February 6 this year launched a National Symbol Review Project under the statutory authority of the Governance Commission with Dr. D. Elwood Dunn as the Project Coordinator.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more