Senate discusses student stress

first_imgStudent Senate met Wednesday night to discuss mental health resources and general stress levels of students at Notre Dame. The goal of the conversation was to begin an ongoing dialogue about student experiences with stress and how the university’s resources can better assist the issues.Student body vice president Matt Devine began the meeting by asking the group in attendance if students are aware of their stress levels and how the levels impact their lives.The group discussed the stigma that exists when students admit to and seek mental health resources; however, the representatives also noted that the dorms serve as support system for students, giving them friends nearby to talk to about stress.Kristen Gates, a representative from Walsh Hall, said she thinks the stress levels of students stems from the desire to succeed.“There is such a high expectation for Notre Dame Students to be extremely involved and excel in academics while holding it all together, but this idea of perfection has negative effects on student stress levels.”Senate plans on holding three focus groups in the future to further gauge student perception on mental-health resources.Senate also voted to pursue a discussion with the registrar about the University’s auditing policy, which entails being able to sit in on a class and receive credit without paying for the class.Student body president Lauren Vidal also presented the State of the Union to the senate. Vidal discussed the senate’s most recent accomplishments, including the O’SNAP program, as well as other goals for the year. Vidal encouraged students to be catalysts of positive change in the campus and the world.“We must look to a time when we have all already graduated and how our actions now will effect students for generations to come,” she said.Tags: Senate, Student governmentlast_img read more

Rail executives plan for long-term decline in coal demand

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Absent orders from the president and his administration or the U.S. Congress, it is unlikely new coal-fired power plants will be built in the United States, a railroad executive said June 13.CSX Corp. is doing “everything we can” to work with coal miners and power plants, the company’s Executive Vice President and CFO Frank Lonegro said at a transportation conference in New York City, but the company still views the U.S. coal sector as being in long-term decline.“Our job is to optimize the bottom line, and that business is really good for us,” Lonegro said. “So we want to stay in that business as long as we possibly can.”The company currently holds a “stable” outlook for domestic utility coal demand. That outlook, Lonegro said, is based on no “real major plant closures in the next couple of years” affecting CSX.At the same conference, Union Pacific Corp. Executive Vice President and CFO Robert Knight said that after watching coal rapidly fall from around 50% to around 30% of the share of U.S. power generation, the railroad is expecting that share to now hover around the high 20s to 30s in the long term.“Yes, there’s probably going to be more downward pressure. There’s going to be some retirements of some utility units. How much coal that means does or does not move in our franchise remains to be seen,” Knight said. “So it feels—I’m not going to call out that it’s stable as a definitive term, but it feels more stable certainly than what we’ve experienced.”More ($): Rail exec: Coal stable, but new plants unlikely without help of Trump, Congress Rail executives plan for long-term decline in coal demandlast_img read more

ABA asks full appeals court to void NCUA’s Field of Membership rule

first_imgThe American Bankers Association is asking the full U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to overturn a panel’s decision that the NCUA had the power to expand its Field of Membership rules.A three-judge panel of appeals court judges said, in dismissing much of the ABA’s challenge of the rule, that the agency did not violate federal law when it allowed an expansion of those rules.In that ruling, the judges said that the NCUA has broad authority in issuing rules governing fields of membership.However, the court also ruled that the NCUA must better explain the part of its rule stating that credit unions may serve core-based statistical areas without serving the area’s urban core. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img