Office of Children’s Advocate Opens Therapeutic Room

first_img The soft tone of the room, in shades of blue, pink, grey, purple and green, is highlighted by the mural, which depicts a nature scene with trees, flowers and butterflies. There are beanbags instead of chairs, and books, dolls and other toys. Adorned with a beautiful hand-painted mural, and outfitted with age-appropriate toys and furnishings, the new therapeutic playroom at the Office of the Children’s Advocate’s downtown Kingston offices will provide a safe and comfortable space for youngsters who have suffered traumatic experiences. Its mission is to promote and protect the rights and best interests of children through vigilance, strategic partnerships and the provision of timely, efficient and quality service. She said with this room, children being catered to by the OCA “will be able to open up as best as possible about the very difficult circumstances to which they would have been exposed”.Mrs. Gordon Harrison noted that the play area is extremely important in advancing the work of the OCA, which was relocated to the 11th floor of the Air Jamaica Building in 2016.She said it was ensured that space was identified to accommodate children within the retrofitting plans for the office.The Children’s Advocate said that having a comfortable setting will facilitate easier communication with children who are hurting and find it difficult to speak about what they are going through.“We see this playroom as really providing that space that would (help children to) relax a little bit more, find some more ease with disclosing what is a very painful experience as opposed to being locked in an office where they are sitting around a desk with somebody who is merely recording a statement,” she noted.Manager for Public Education and Special Projects at the OCA, LatoyaMinott-Hall, expressed gratitude to the “committed students who understand and have a drive and passion and a desire to help with the (children) whom we serve here”.Through the partnership with the NCU, students from the institution are serving as interns at the OCA. The first group started in April and another group came on in June.Mrs. Minott-Hall noted that the assistance of the students has helped to alleviate staff constraints and lighten the workload of the agency.Kemar Daswell, who assisted on the therapy room project and is serving as an intern, told JIS News that the students are pleased with the outcome and the positive impact it will have on the beneficiaries.The project was carried out with support from Berger Paints, Food For The Poor and Do Good Jamaica/Crayons Count.The OCA is mandated to enforce and protect the rights and best interests of children. The office was established in 2006 under the Child Care and Protection Act (2004).Its mission is to promote and protect the rights and best interests of children through vigilance, strategic partnerships and the provision of timely, efficient and quality service.center_img Story Highlights Adorned with a beautiful hand-painted mural, and outfitted with age-appropriate toys and furnishings, the new therapeutic playroom at the Office of the Children’s Advocate’s downtown Kingston offices will provide a safe and comfortable space for youngsters who have suffered traumatic experiences.The playroom will be used by the OCA’s Investigations Unit to treat and counsel children aged two to 18.The soft tone of the room, in shades of blue, pink, grey, purple and green, is highlighted by the mural, which depicts a nature scene with trees, flowers and butterflies. There are beanbags instead of chairs, and books, dolls and other toys.Such rooms encourage healing through play and provide an environment of physical and emotional safety for children.Transformed through partnership with the Northern Caribbean University (NCU), the room was officially handed over on October 18.The initiative was in fulfilment of the community outreach component of a Group Dynamics and Leadership course being pursued by four NCU students – Kemar Daswell, Acoya Rademari, Chandrika Campbell and Leon Ffrench.Children’s Advocate, Diahann Gordon Harrison, said she is grateful for the assistance from the students, who converted an empty room into a calm and relaxing space where children can be interviewed.last_img read more

The Sleepers To Watch In The World Cup Knockout Rounds

The World Cup is not traditionally the tournament for underdogs. The trophy has been lifted by just eight countries — and five of those have won multiple times. But there’s usually enough room for a few Cinderella stories to creep into the knockout phase: Bulgaria (1994), South Korea (2002) and Turkey (2002) were unexpected semifinalists, while Cameroon (1990), Ghana (2010) and Costa Rica (2014) crashed the quarterfinals. At least one country seems to do this every four years.We see three teams that could fit the bill this summer. Before the tournament, each of them had no greater than a 3 percent chance of winning it all, according to FiveThirtyEight’s model, but each has performed well so far and could make a strong run in the knockout rounds.Croatia3 percent chance pre-tournament to win it all, 7 percent nowAs we noted in our preview of Group D, Croatia is blessed with an abundance of central midfield talent, most notably Luka Modric of Real Madrid and Ivan Rakitic of Barcelona. Getting the pair ticking together was the most important challenge for manager Zlatko Dalic coming into Russia.The two started together as a double pivot in Croatia’s opening game against Nigeria, but the risk of playing two aging, attack-minded central midfielders is too great against teams with a potent counterattack — as Germany found out after fielding Sami Khedira and Toni Kroos together against Mexico. Dalic’s solution against better teams seems to be playing the pair in front of Marcelo Brozovic, who is comfortable taking care of the defensive duties, freeing up Modric and Rakitic to focus on the attack.In its second game, Croatia comfortably outclassed Argentina — which employed an extremely high press to avoid playing through Croatia’s midfield. The Argentine press allowed Modric and Rakitic to become the focal point of Croatia’s counterattacks, feeding the ball quickly into their wingers, Ivan Perisic and Ante Rebic. Spain5.0 Belgium7.5 Source: Opta Sports Shots3.838 France5.0 Unlike other small teams, the Swiss press high and aggressively rather than waiting for their opposition to come to them: The team ranks second for possession regains in the attacking third of the pitch per game so far in Russia. Brazil7.0 Against Serbia, Switzerland came from behind dramatically to snatch a victory. The Swiss now have a 96 percent chance of making the round of 16, despite a controversy over political celebrations that threatened to embroil the team: Xherdan Shaqiri and Granit Xhaka, who each scored a goal against Serbia, made eagle gestures referring to their Albanian Kosovar heritage,1Kosovo declared its independence from Serbia in 2008, and Serbia doesn’t recognize Kosovo as a country. and team captain Stephan Lichtsteiner also made the gesture. Luckily for the Swiss, though, FIFA decided to fine rather than ban them.Switzerland has a style of play that could cause serious problems for bigger teams — and is in the strongest position it has been to reach a quarterfinal for the first time since 1954.Check out our latest World Cup predictions. Among attackers with a minimum of 800 minutesSource: Football Whispers Russia5.5 Goals0.653 Rank Assists0.3014 Argentina8.0 Denmark6.0 Successful dribbles2.3426 Serbia6.0 Offensive statistics per 90 minutes for Mexico’s Hirving Lozano with PSV in the Dutch Eredivisie, 2017-18 The terrifying pace of Lozano, who is rumored to be a target of Barcelona, is complemented well by the positioning and hold-up play of Javier Hernandez, with the two combining for goals against both Germany and South Korea. Carlos Vela, meanwhile, has a relatively free role in the attack, drifting into pockets of space to get the ball and take men on.If Mexico does manage to finish first in the group, it will probably have to play Switzerland, another team that has performed surprisingly well in Russia.Switzerland2 percent chance pre-tournament, 3 percent nowTwenty minutes into the opener against Brazil, when Philippe Coutinho scored a characteristically brilliant long-range goal for the Selecao, many had already written off Switzerland’s chances of getting anything from the game. But the underdogs rallied in the second half, grabbing an equalizer to frustrate the Brazilians and hold out for a crucial point. Switzerland7.5 Both Modric and Rakitic scored in a victory that crystallized Croatia’s position as an underdog to watch this summer. Croatia should get a relatively easy matchup against Denmark in the Round of 16 and would be a tough out for any team after that.MexicoLess than 1 percent chance pre-tournament, 1 percent nowMexico’s chances haven’t risen much, but that’s mainly because of how tight Group F is after Germany’s last-gasp winner against Sweden. Despite winning its first two matches, including beating the defending champions in the opener, El Tri has just a 72 percent of making it through the group right now, with its fate riding on the match with Sweden.If it does make it through, Mexico has a pesky combination of compact defensive structure and electric counterattacking ability that will cause any big opposition real problems. Hirving “Chucky” Lozano is looking like this World Cup’s breakout star, with a goal and an assist in his first two appearances — no surprise to those who saw him help PSV Eindhoven to a title this season in the Dutch Eredivisie. Possessions won per match in the attacking third of the field for 2018 World Cup teams, through June 24 England5.0 Open-play assists1.4523 teamPossessions Won read more

San Diego Chamber of Commerce extends contract for President Jerry Sanders

first_img Carlos Amezcua, Lauren Phinney Carlos Amezcua, Lauren Phinney, San Diego Chamber of Commerce extends contract for President Jerry Sanders 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsPresident of the San Diego Chamber of Commerce Jerry Sanders and Board Chair Sam Attisha visited the studio Tuesday morning to talk about Jerry’s 2-year contract extension.The Chamber of Commerce announced in late June that Jerry’s contract as President and CEO had been extended two years through the end of 2022.“Since day one Jerry has had a positive impact on the Chamber and has been the driving force behind the Chamber’s growth and effectiveness,” said Sam Attisha, Chamber Board Chair and Senior Vice President and Region Manager of Cox Communications. “His leadership has helped move the San Diego region forward by proactively engaging our elected officials, rallying our members, and connecting with the public to address the issues most important to job creation and our region.”“We are truly fortunate to have a trusted leader like Jerry who is so invested in a prosperous future for our region,” Attisha said.Sanders commented: “I am extremely proud of the strides we have made in establishing the Chamber as a strong, effective voice for the business community and I look forward to building on that progress. The Chamber is committed as ever to providing the resources that help all businesses grow and thrive and advocating for the policies and leaders that make San Diego a great place to do business.”The San Diego Regional Chamber is the hub for connections and collaboration among the regional business community, and uses that clout to advocate for public policies and candidates that support economic growth and the creation of jobs for all businesses. As the largest local Chamber on the West Coast, representing approximately 2,500 businesses and an estimated 300,000 jobs, the San Diego Regional Chamber is fighting to make San Diego the most business-friendly region in California. For more information, please visit SDChamber.org or call 619-544-1300. Posted: July 17, 2018center_img July 17, 2018 Updated: 3:11 PM Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Save 15 on a tiny selfcontained Spotify player

first_img 4 The Cheapskate Share your voice Comments Sarah Tew/CNET Are you a Spotify subscriber? Then you’ve no doubt discovered the limitations for listening offline. It requires a phone, which isn’t always convenient — like when you’re at the gym or out for a run. And even if you do have your phone, you’ll have to devote a chunk of precious storage to your Spotify playlists.The Mighty Vibe solves those problems. This portable player — a dead ringer for Apple’s dearly departed Shuffle — absorbs your Spotify playlists and podcasts for easy offline listening. Read CNET’s Mighty Vibe review to learn more.It normally sells for $86 (currently on sale for $5 less), but for a limited time, Cheapskate readers can get the Mighty Vibe for $69.99 with promo code MIGHTYCHEAP. Shipping adds $5.See it at MightyThis is the second-gen version of the Mighty, featuring better battery life (at least 5 hours of play time), broader Bluetooth compatibility, better Bluetooth range and a redesigned mobile app.It’s also now available in a couple snazzy colors. In addition to basic black, you can choose a teal or red case.As noted, the Mighty Vibe looks and operates much like an iPod Shuffle, right down to its spring-loaded clip and simplistic controls. What’s handy here, though, is that you can pair it to Bluetooth earphones for a wireless listening experience. I just tried it with a wire-free set — pretty nice!There is a headphone jack if you want to go wired, and that jack is also used to charge the Vibe. A spare cable will run you $7. The player can hold up to 1,000 songs, but you can’t sync specific artists or albums, only playlists.That minor limitation aside, I can’t understand why this is product isn’t better known or more popular. It is, to my knowledge, the only offline-Spotify gadget currently available, and it’s a very affordable way to carry around your favorite playlists and podcasts without a phone.Note: This post was published previously and has been updated regarding pricing and discount code.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! center_img Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Tags MP3 Playerslast_img read more

A Test of the Copernican Principle

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. However, as physicists Robert Caldwell of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and Albert Stebbins of Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, point out, the Copernican principle has never been confirmed as a whole. In a recent paper published in Physical Review Letters called “A Test of the Copernican Principle,” the two researchers set out to prove the 500-year-old principle using observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB).“The Copernican principle is a cornerstone of most of astronomy, it is assumed without question, and plays an important role in many statistical tests for the viability of cosmological models,” Stebbins told PhysOrg.com. “It is also a necessary consequence of the stronger assumption of the Cosmological Principle: namely, that not only do we not live in a special part of the universe, but there are no special parts of the universe – everything is the same everywhere (up to statistical variation). “It is a very handy principle, since it implies that here and now is the same as there and now, and here and then is the same as there and then. We do not have to look back in time at our current location to see how the universe was in our past – we can just look very far away, and given the large light travel time, we are looking at a distant part of the universe in the distant past. Given the Cosmological Principle, their past is the same as our past.”Cosmic DistortionWhen the universe was just 400,000 years old, matter and radiation decoupled and left a remnant radiation that still pervades the entire universe today. By measuring the tiny temperature fluctuations of this CMB radiation, scientists can learn things about the universe such as its shape, size, and rate of expansion. In the latter case, the observations show that the universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate, leading scientists to speculate about the existence of dark energy, new laws of gravity, and other possible – and often exotic – theories.But what if the universe’s accelerating expansion is just an illusion? As Caldwell and Stebbins explained, this scenario is entirely plausible if the Copernican principle is loosened a bit. If, instead of the universe being homogenous and isotropic as the Cosmological Principle states, there is rather “a peculiar distribution of matter centered upon our location,” then the universe would be centered on a low-density, matter-dominated void. Such a universe would be non-accelerating, and there would be no need for dark energy or other similar theories. That’s why it’s important to know if the Copernican principle is correct: it will ensure that CMB observations haven’t been misinterpreted to indicate cosmic acceleration when there is none. To test the principle, Caldwell and Stebbins developed a “CMB-distortion test”: they looked for deviations of the CMB spectrum from a perfect blackbody as might have been caused by a large, local void. A void or other “non-Copernican structure” would cause ionized gas to move relative to the CMB, and the Doppler-shifted CMB scattered toward us could contain detectable deviations from a blackbody. “In essence, we use the reionized Universe as a mirror to look at ourselves in CMB light,” the researchers explained. “If we see ourselves in the mirror, it is because ours is a privileged location. If we see nothing [i.e. no peculiar distortions] in the mirror, then the Copernican principle is upheld.”The Hubble BubbleAs an initial test, Caldwell and Stebbins focused on a universe model consisting of a simple, spherically symmetric void, which is also known as a “Hubble bubble.” This void universe resembles an open (low-density) universe embedded inside a flat (medium-density) universe. The size of the void depends on how gas is distributed throughout the universe. Basically, gas can exist in three zones – neutral, reflection, and Doppler – depending on its redshift. Depending on how these three zones overlap, the void can come in five sizes, from small to “superhorizon,” where the void encompasses the entire observable universe.Using their CMB-distortion test, the researchers calculated that only the smaller void models could lead to the type of distortion associated with a violation of the Copernican principle. Then, by analyzing data for the CMB spectrum, they were able to rule out nearly all of these non-Copernican Hubble bubble void universes – meaning the Copernican principle passed this first test. However, Caldwell and Stebbins also noted that other models – such as those with a higher density or smaller radius – may still exist that evade this test.The researchers added that this is not the first time that bits of the Copernican principle have been tested, but it is one of the first tests of the remaining radial inhomogeneity on very large scales. Caldwell explained that, in 1995, physicist Jeremy Goodman of Princeton proposed a similar test of spectral distortions. Goodman’s implementation resulted in a weaker constraint, or test, of the Copernican principle.“This [large-scale testing] is not easy to do because, when we look far away, we are looking back in time, and it is difficult to say whether what we see is due to changes with time, which does not violate the Copernican principle, or changes with distance, which does,” Stebbins explained. “Thus, it is a hard question to answer, which is why it has not been done.”More TestsIn the future, the scientists plan to further pinpoint the CMB distortions that could be caused by a local non-Copernican structure, and also apply the test to other more general universe models. These tests should be useful in potentially ruling out alternative hypotheses for dark energy, as Caldwell explained. More fundamentally, the tests could either verify the foundation of centuries of astronomical work, or – and the chance is slim – suggest that the Copernican principle may not be as certain as we think.“If our test of the Copernican principle were to fail, it would probably not be believed, and a variety of other observations would be required to test it,” Stebbins said. “If all these further tests confirmed the large void, then we would have to rethink our ideas about dark energy, or, namely, unthink them. “I think the scientific community would not be too unhappy with the idea of a large under-dense region – it is not hard to think of ideas of how they might come to be, even in the context of a hot big bang model. What is hard to understand is why we would be so close to the center of one. No doubt someone would come up with an ‘anthropic’ argument for it – but I’ve thought a bit about that, and don’t really think there is a salable anthropic explanation. (By the way, I don’t think there is a salable intelligent design reason, either.) In the end, we might have to live with the Walter Cronkite explanation ‘… and that’s the way it is …. ’”More information: Caldwell, R. R. and Stebbins, A. “A Test of the Copernican Principle.” Physical Review Letters 100, 191302 (2008). Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This image shows a cross-section of a void universe with an observer (O) in the center, in violation of the Copernican principle. CMB photons (yellow lines) can scatter off reionized gas, and some may lead to CMB distortions. Credit: Caldwell, R. R. and Stebbins, A. ©2008 APS. Explore furthercenter_img Earth not center of the universe, surrounded by ‘dark energy’: cosmologists report Citation: A Test of the Copernican Principle (2008, May 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-05-copernican-principle.html The Copernican principle states that the Earth is not the center of the universe, and that, as observers, we don’t occupy a special place. First stated by Copernicus in the 16th century, today the idea is wholly accepted by scientists, and is an assumed concept in many astronomical theories.last_img read more