Buffon reckons Neymars absence will be a huge miss

first_imgWith Neymar set to face a lengthy spell on the sidelines, Gianluigi Buffon has revealed the Champions League will be quite difficult for Paris Saint-Germain to winThe veteran Italian shot-stopper is not a stranger to Europe’s top-tier competition as his team heads into the crucial stages of the tournament.Neymar who has notched in 20 goals in 23 games this season will miss PSG’s last-16 tie against Manchester United due to a foot injury suffered last month..@neymarjr gives OTRO an exclusive look as he begins his road to recovery. We can’t wait to see you back on the pitch. #OurOtherClub pic.twitter.com/xYMzeZ9mSb— OTRO (@OTRO) February 2, 2019Buffon, 41, is yet to win the top European club competition in his illustrious career and the PSG goalkeeper said Neymar’s absence hurt his side’s chances.“Every year, I always thought it could be the right year. But it is now 24 years since I am trying to win the Champions League,” he said on Saturday and cited via FourFourTwo.Cristiano Ronaldo, Nemanja Vidic, Manchester UnitedVidic: “Ronaldo is the most professional footballer I’ve seen” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Nemanja Vidic opened up on how a 21-year-old Cristiano Ronaldo’s professionalism left him stunned at Manchester United.“But it’s tough to do so. You have to be a bit lucky. Right now for us, it’s a particular time because Ney got injured.“For us, Ney is a significant player because he did incredible stuff for the team during the last three months.“For us, it’s dangerous not to have him.”With United’s resurgence in recent weeks, Thomas Tuchel knows his side are up for what could be a classic European tie, as the French side battle to land that elusive crown.PSG head to Old Trafford for the first leg of their tie against United on February 12.Gianluigi Buffon is concerned that Neymar’s injury means his 24-year wait for a Champions League title could continue 😱 pic.twitter.com/2KVSeT9JZa— Goal (@goal) February 3, 2019last_img read more

NFIB small business association to join campaign to repeal gas tax hike

first_imgNFIB small business association to join campaign to repeal gas tax hike July 11, 2018 Ed Lenderman, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsCARMEL VALLEY (KUSI) – Supporters of the Gas Tax Repeal Initiative are touting what they says is an important endorsement.An association said to be the largest representative of small and independent businesses, in California and the nation, is joining the repeal campaign. The initiative recently qualified for the November ballot.Carl DeMaio, the principal organizer of the repeal, says the endorsement by the National Federation of Independent Businesses is important because it represents a “business-group’s break” with Governor Brown. DeMaio was live on Good Morning San Diego and told KUSI’s Ed Lenderman that the Governor and legislators in Sacramento have threatened business groups if they aren’t neutral or if they support the tax.According to DeMaio, they say their offices will be closed to groups that support the repeal and, what’s more, won’t allow the groups to get legislation done. DeMaio says a trucking association cancelled his appearance at the Governor’s request.“The gas and car tax hikes will hit California small business owners hard and will lead to higher prices for every Californian. We are pleased that NFIB is standing up to Governor Jerry Brown and Sacramento politicians to fight for small businesses and every California consumer by supporting Yes on Prop 6 to repeal the gas tax.”— Carl DeMaio, Chairman of Reform California and Yes on Prop 6 – Gas Tax Repeal Campaign.RELATED STORY: Carl DeMaio gives update on Gas Tax Hike Repeal InitiativeGovernor Brown has called the measure flawed and dangerous. For more information, click here. Ed Lenderman center_img Updated: 11:52 AM Posted: July 11, 2018 Categories: California News, Local San Diego News, Politics Tags: Carl DeMaio, Gas Tax, Gas Tax Repeal Initiative FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Mother of Cathedral Catholic student sentenced for supplying drugs to minors

first_imgMother of Cathedral Catholic student sentenced for supplying drugs to minors Posted: August 24, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — A woman who provided prescription drugs, alcohol and other narcotics to her daughter — a student at Cathedral Catholic High School — and other minors was sentenced Friday to 11 years and eight months in state prison.Kimberly Dawn Quach, 49, pleaded guilty in May to five felony charges, including furnishing Xanax to a minor and employing a minor to transport or sell marijuana.Superior Court Judge Timothy Walsh — who imposed the maximum term under the plea agreement — said Quach’s conduct fell “well short of being a good parent.”“Her conduct is absolutely sickening to the court,” the judge said, noting that children are among the most vulnerable members of society.Walsh said Quach exposed her 17- and 10-year-old daughters and their friends to extreme danger.“She literally taught them to be drug dealers,” the judge said.Quach’s live-in companion, William Sipperley III, 50, was sentenced to six years and four months in prison. He had pleaded guilty to using a minor to transport or sell marijuana and furnishing marijuana to a minor over 14 years old.Sipperley’s attorney, Domenic Lombardo, told the judge his client moved in with Quach after his wife of 36 years died and he had turned to taking drugs and smoking marijuana.Lombardo said Sipperley did not condone the drug sales and parties at Quach’s Carmel Valley home and “should have been man enough to get out of there.”Deputy District Attorney Christina Eastman said two minors that Quach gave drugs to ended up in a drug rehabilitation program.Eastman said Quach was in the process of setting up a marijuana distribution operation in her home and wanted to be the “cool mom.”The prosecutor said Sipperley taught Quach’s then-9-year-old daughter how to plant marijuana.Quach was arrested last year after police said she sold or offered the controlled substance suboxone, a prescription opiate, and Xanax to minors over a nine-month period beginning Jan. 1, 2017. Quach also gave at least 10 teens marijuana to sell, package or transport, according to police, who said Cathedral Catholic students regularly smoked cannabis that Sipperley grew at the couple’s home on Aster Meadows Place in Carmel Valley.One detective said Quach had as many as 70 teenage clients at Cathedral Catholic and other schools.During a search of Quach’s home, police found large containers of marijuana, plant food, grow lights and drug paraphernalia, according to the criminal complaint. KUSI Newsroom August 24, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Man stabbed while sitting at a bar in Barrio Logan

first_img Posted: October 8, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter October 8, 2018 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Police Monday were searching for a man suspected of stabbing a 39-year-old man in the abdomen in the Barrio Logan area.It happened shortly before 6:15 p.m. Sunday in the 1900 block of National Avenue, located near Chicano Park, San Diego police Officer John Buttle said.The suspect walked up to the 39-year-old man, who was sitting at the bar, and stabbed him in the abdomen for unknown reasons before fleeing the area, Buttle said.The victim was transported to the hospital with injuries that were not believed to be life-threatening, Buttle said.The suspect was described as a Hispanic man believed to be in his 30s, who was last seen wearing a plaid shirt and blue jeans.Detectives from the San Diego Police Department’s gang unit were investigating the incident. Man stabbed while sitting at a bar in Barrio Loganlast_img read more

2nd Annual Chelseas Light Foundation Golf Classic

first_img KUSI Newsroom, 2nd Annual Chelsea’s Light Foundation Golf Classic May 31, 2019 Posted: May 31, 2019 KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – She was abducted and murdered a decade ago but her father is trying to bring positivity from the death of Chelsea King.The Chelsea’s Light Foundation is holding their 2nd Annual Chelsea’s Light Foundation Golf Classic to help protect the joy and innocence of childhood.The tournament includes golf, beer garden, lunch, dinner, and a poker tourney.Chelsea’s father, Brent King, is visiting San Diego to award the foundations annual Sunflower Scholarship to 14 students.King joined KUSI News to discuss the tournament and what the foundations means to him.Tickets: www.chelseaslight.org last_img read more

AMI Reports Strong Quarter

first_imgAMI saw a 7 percent decrease in expenses, according to chief financial officer Dean Durbin, who attributed the strong results to cost-reduction and revenue-enhancement goals outlined in AMI’s “management action plan” in February 2007.The turnaround comes at a particularly interesting time for AMI. In December, a sale of the company to Ron Burkle’s Source Interlink was reportedly imminent, but has stalled in 2008.Last month, the company swapped CFOs, with Durbin, a former CEO at Vertis Communications and a b-to-b publishing veteran of Thomson and McGraw-Hill, becoming AMI’s sixth CFO in four years. American Media Inc., a company whose troubles making financial filing deadlines are well documented, has reported strong earnings for third quarter of fiscal year 2008.According to AMI’s filing late last week, revenue for the third quarter of fiscal year 2008 was $115 million, as compared to $107 for the same period in 2007—a 7 percent increase. For the nine months ended December 31, 2007, revenues were $368 million, compared to $346 million in the prior year—a 6 percent increase. The publisher of Star, National Enquirer, Shape and Men’s Fitness attributed the boost to increases in advertising and newsstand revenue. According to Publishers Information Bureau (PIB) figures, Shape’s ad pages increased by 13 percent in 2007, Star and Men’s Fitness by 25 percent. AMI’s reported operating income for the third quarter of fiscal year 2008 was $17 million, compared to a loss of $302 million in the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. (For the nine months ended December 31, 2007, operating income was $75 million, as compared to a loss of $275 million in the prior year.) The company also doubled its EBITDA for the third quarter of fiscal year 2008 was $24 million, as compared to $12 million in the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. For the nine months ended December 31, 2007, EBITDA was $95 million, as compared to $56 million in the prior year period.last_img read more

Ft Monmouth LRA to Pay 33M for Parcels on Main Post

first_imgThe Army will sell the remaining parcels on the main post at the former Fort Monmouth on the northern New Jersey coast to the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority for $33 million, under a draft agreement.While no date has been set for the two parties to complete the deal, LRA officials believe the property transfer should be completed by early fall, reported the Asbury Park Press.“There’s no doubt in my mind now we’re going to get there. It’s either going to be August, September or October,” said Bruce Steadman, the LRA’s executive director.The deal for the remaining parcels on the main post — which will be an outright sale of the property to the LRA — marks the second phase of the property transfer. The LRA plans to seek funding for the purchase from the Monmouth County Improvement Authority.The LRA plans to cover about $10 million of the debt through the sale of three parcels of land on the main post within a year of the transfer. The Army will retain all statutory environmental responsibilities on the main post, under the terms of the transfer.The Army earlier conveyed three parcels on the main post and the installation’s Charles Wood tract to the authority for $1. The Army receives 60 percent of the revenue from parcels sold under that agreement. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Japan restarts second reactor at Sendai nuclear plant

first_img Japan restarted a second reactor at the Sendai nuclear plant on the southwestern island of Kyushu on Thursday (15 October), as the government pushes ahead with an unpopular return to atomic energy in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster.The restart of the Sendai No 2 unit marks progress for Japans utilities, which have been hit by huge losses after being forced to shut down nuclear plants for safety checks.Weve actively implemented various safety measures including disaster prevention schemes to never let anything like the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident happen again, chief manager of Sendai nuclear plant Rei Sudou said, after his staff switched on the dormant reactor No 2 at 10.30am.The unit will begin power generation on 21 October and is expected to enter commercial operation from around mid-November. Kyushu Electric Power Co restarted the No 1 unit at the Sendai plant in August after approval from the countrys atomic regulator came following two years of reviews and equipment checks.Anxious to cut fuel bills, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe wants atomic power to account for 20-22% of the countrys energy mix by 2030, but the goal is widely seen as unrealistic and opposition to nuclear power remains widespread. Opinion polls have consistently shown strong opposition to nuclear power among the public, even as electricity bills surged following the switch to expensive fossil fuels.We will continue to restart nuclear reactors that meet whats called one of the most strict safety standards in the world, respecting the judgement of the governments nuclear authority, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said during a regular news conference on Thursday.The government is unchanged with its determination that we should restart nuclear reactors that meet the safety standards as were currently relying on old fuel generators that are forcedly put into operation, Suga added. Closelast_img read more

Merkel plans EU migrant summit

first_imgGerman chancellor Angela Merkel gestures at a news conference with NATO secretary-general Jens Stoltenberg (not pictured) in the German Chancellery in Berlin, Germany on 15 June. Photo: ReutersGerman chancellor Angela Merkel, struggling to avert a crisis within her coalition on migrant policy, is trying to set up a meeting of some EU states to discuss the issue before a leaders summit on 28-29 June, a German newspaper reported on Sunday.Citing government sources from representatives of several EU states, top-selling Bild reported on its website that Merkel wanted to discuss possible solutions with Greece, Italy and Austria.“It is not yet agreed, we are in the planning phase. It is also unclear exactly when this special summit would take place,” a member of the Italian government told Bild. The paper added that next weekend might be one possibility.A German government spokesperson was not immediately available to comment on the report.EU states are deeply divided on how to deal with large numbers of people fleeing conflict, especially from the Middle East. The issue has come to a head in the last week with a new Italian government refusing to let a ship carrying hundreds of migrants dock at its ports.Merkel is adamant that migrant policy can only be effectively agreed and implemented at the European level and is at loggerheads with her own conservative Bavarian allies and her Interior Minister who want unilateral action.The Bavarians have threatened to defy Merkel and on Monday go ahead with plans which she has sought to block. Under the minister’s proposal, Germany would send back migrants who have already registered in other EU countries.This would undermine Merkel’s authority as it represents a reversal of her 2015 open-door approach, and would also be a blow to the EU’s Schengen open-border system.Merkel has asked the Bavarian conservatives to give her two weeks to come up with bilateral deals with some countries, like Italy and Greece, similar to one agreed between Turkey and the EU in 2016.Bild said it was unclear whether Spain and other countries from the Balkans would take part in Merkel’s meeting.last_img read more

A Test of the Copernican Principle

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. However, as physicists Robert Caldwell of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and Albert Stebbins of Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, point out, the Copernican principle has never been confirmed as a whole. In a recent paper published in Physical Review Letters called “A Test of the Copernican Principle,” the two researchers set out to prove the 500-year-old principle using observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB).“The Copernican principle is a cornerstone of most of astronomy, it is assumed without question, and plays an important role in many statistical tests for the viability of cosmological models,” Stebbins told PhysOrg.com. “It is also a necessary consequence of the stronger assumption of the Cosmological Principle: namely, that not only do we not live in a special part of the universe, but there are no special parts of the universe – everything is the same everywhere (up to statistical variation). “It is a very handy principle, since it implies that here and now is the same as there and now, and here and then is the same as there and then. We do not have to look back in time at our current location to see how the universe was in our past – we can just look very far away, and given the large light travel time, we are looking at a distant part of the universe in the distant past. Given the Cosmological Principle, their past is the same as our past.”Cosmic DistortionWhen the universe was just 400,000 years old, matter and radiation decoupled and left a remnant radiation that still pervades the entire universe today. By measuring the tiny temperature fluctuations of this CMB radiation, scientists can learn things about the universe such as its shape, size, and rate of expansion. In the latter case, the observations show that the universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate, leading scientists to speculate about the existence of dark energy, new laws of gravity, and other possible – and often exotic – theories.But what if the universe’s accelerating expansion is just an illusion? As Caldwell and Stebbins explained, this scenario is entirely plausible if the Copernican principle is loosened a bit. If, instead of the universe being homogenous and isotropic as the Cosmological Principle states, there is rather “a peculiar distribution of matter centered upon our location,” then the universe would be centered on a low-density, matter-dominated void. Such a universe would be non-accelerating, and there would be no need for dark energy or other similar theories. That’s why it’s important to know if the Copernican principle is correct: it will ensure that CMB observations haven’t been misinterpreted to indicate cosmic acceleration when there is none. To test the principle, Caldwell and Stebbins developed a “CMB-distortion test”: they looked for deviations of the CMB spectrum from a perfect blackbody as might have been caused by a large, local void. A void or other “non-Copernican structure” would cause ionized gas to move relative to the CMB, and the Doppler-shifted CMB scattered toward us could contain detectable deviations from a blackbody. “In essence, we use the reionized Universe as a mirror to look at ourselves in CMB light,” the researchers explained. “If we see ourselves in the mirror, it is because ours is a privileged location. If we see nothing [i.e. no peculiar distortions] in the mirror, then the Copernican principle is upheld.”The Hubble BubbleAs an initial test, Caldwell and Stebbins focused on a universe model consisting of a simple, spherically symmetric void, which is also known as a “Hubble bubble.” This void universe resembles an open (low-density) universe embedded inside a flat (medium-density) universe. The size of the void depends on how gas is distributed throughout the universe. Basically, gas can exist in three zones – neutral, reflection, and Doppler – depending on its redshift. Depending on how these three zones overlap, the void can come in five sizes, from small to “superhorizon,” where the void encompasses the entire observable universe.Using their CMB-distortion test, the researchers calculated that only the smaller void models could lead to the type of distortion associated with a violation of the Copernican principle. Then, by analyzing data for the CMB spectrum, they were able to rule out nearly all of these non-Copernican Hubble bubble void universes – meaning the Copernican principle passed this first test. However, Caldwell and Stebbins also noted that other models – such as those with a higher density or smaller radius – may still exist that evade this test.The researchers added that this is not the first time that bits of the Copernican principle have been tested, but it is one of the first tests of the remaining radial inhomogeneity on very large scales. Caldwell explained that, in 1995, physicist Jeremy Goodman of Princeton proposed a similar test of spectral distortions. Goodman’s implementation resulted in a weaker constraint, or test, of the Copernican principle.“This [large-scale testing] is not easy to do because, when we look far away, we are looking back in time, and it is difficult to say whether what we see is due to changes with time, which does not violate the Copernican principle, or changes with distance, which does,” Stebbins explained. “Thus, it is a hard question to answer, which is why it has not been done.”More TestsIn the future, the scientists plan to further pinpoint the CMB distortions that could be caused by a local non-Copernican structure, and also apply the test to other more general universe models. These tests should be useful in potentially ruling out alternative hypotheses for dark energy, as Caldwell explained. More fundamentally, the tests could either verify the foundation of centuries of astronomical work, or – and the chance is slim – suggest that the Copernican principle may not be as certain as we think.“If our test of the Copernican principle were to fail, it would probably not be believed, and a variety of other observations would be required to test it,” Stebbins said. “If all these further tests confirmed the large void, then we would have to rethink our ideas about dark energy, or, namely, unthink them. “I think the scientific community would not be too unhappy with the idea of a large under-dense region – it is not hard to think of ideas of how they might come to be, even in the context of a hot big bang model. What is hard to understand is why we would be so close to the center of one. No doubt someone would come up with an ‘anthropic’ argument for it – but I’ve thought a bit about that, and don’t really think there is a salable anthropic explanation. (By the way, I don’t think there is a salable intelligent design reason, either.) In the end, we might have to live with the Walter Cronkite explanation ‘… and that’s the way it is …. ’”More information: Caldwell, R. R. and Stebbins, A. “A Test of the Copernican Principle.” Physical Review Letters 100, 191302 (2008). Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This image shows a cross-section of a void universe with an observer (O) in the center, in violation of the Copernican principle. CMB photons (yellow lines) can scatter off reionized gas, and some may lead to CMB distortions. Credit: Caldwell, R. R. and Stebbins, A. ©2008 APS. Explore furthercenter_img Earth not center of the universe, surrounded by ‘dark energy’: cosmologists report Citation: A Test of the Copernican Principle (2008, May 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-05-copernican-principle.html The Copernican principle states that the Earth is not the center of the universe, and that, as observers, we don’t occupy a special place. First stated by Copernicus in the 16th century, today the idea is wholly accepted by scientists, and is an assumed concept in many astronomical theories.last_img read more

Shout out loud for Beltek

first_imgThe party season approaches as the mercury seems to be taking a breather. Adding to the ever expanding list of international DJs visiting the Capital gets one more name added. Here’s Martin Beltek Bijelic, better known simply as Beltek.In just a couple of years since he won Pete Tong’s competition with Copacabana, Beltek’s name regularly pops out on top of EDM music charts and labels such as Dim Mak, Ministry of Sound etc. His versatile production skills and fingerprint mass appealing sound already assured him remixing duties for major artists such as Faithless, Booka Shade, Gareth Emery and others. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In the city for his maiden tour by Kyoas Entertainment, Millennium Post catches up with the artiste. Read on. How do you like the music scene in India?Actually I was really happy to see that a lot of people here in India know my music. So as far as I saw the scene here, I like it big time. When did you start with this career? My career started with my first release, Copacabana on Chris Lake’s label Rising Music in 2008. And the main suspect to blame for my career start was Pete Tong. Since I won his music production contest Bedroom Bedlam back in 2007 with my track Copacabana. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHow has the journey been? Tell us about the best and the worst times so far…My journey was most of the time and still is very inspiring, joyful and positive for me. I think if you lose joy and inspiration for whatever is that you are doing, then you should definitely change your job. The only a bit not so cherished moments of my job are the flight and airport waiting moments. Those are the worst. What songs top your own playlist right now? Define your music philosophy for us Mike Hawkins, Pablo Oliveros – Bangover Jacob Plant – Fire and obviously some of my own.My music philosophy is simple – Like, Inhale, Connect and Party.last_img read more

Business Execs Who Stay in Asian Luxury Hotels Fall Prey to Cyber

first_imgNovember 10, 2014 3 min read Security researchers have uncovered a sophisticated industrial espionage campaign that targets business executives in luxury hotels across Asia once they sign on to computers using in-room wireless connections they consider private and secure.The attacks, which go well beyond typical cybercriminal operations, have claimed thousands of victims dating back to 2009 and continue to do so, Kaspersky Lab, the world’s largest private security firm, shows in a report published on Monday.Executives from the auto, outsourced manufacturing, cosmetic and chemical industries have been hit, the security firm said. Others targeted include military services and contractors.In 2012, the FBI issued a general warning to U.S. government officials, businessmen and academics, advising them to use caution when updating computer software via hotel Internet connections when traveling abroad.Kaspersky’s report goes further in detailing the scale, methods and precise targeting of these attacks on top business travelers.The movements of executives appear to be tracked as they travel, allowing attackers to pounce once a victim logs on to a hotel Wi-Fi network. Hackers cover their tracks by deleting these tools off hotel networks afterward.”These attackers are going after a very specific set of individuals who should be very aware of the value of their information and be taking strong measures to protect it,” said Kurt Baumgartner, principal security researcher for Kaspersky, the world’s largest privately held cybersecurity firm.Unsuspecting executives who submit their room number and surname while logging on to their hotel room’s wireless network are tricked into downloading an update to legitimate software such as Adobe Flash, Google Toolbar or Microsoft Messenger, Kaspersky said. Because attacks happen at sign-on, encrypted communications set up later offer no defense against attack.The same elite spying crew has used advanced keystroke-logging software and encryption-breaking at multiple hotel chains across Asia, it said.Kaspersky declined to name the executives involved or the luxury destinations targeted but said it had informed the hotels as well as law enforcement officials in affected locations.Ninety percent of the victims came from five countries — Japan, Taiwan, China, Russia and South Korea. Business travelers to Asia from Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland and the United States have also been duped, Baumgartner said.The Kaspersky report said a key mystery remains how attackers appear to know the precise travel itinerary of each victim, which points to a larger compromise of hotel business networks that researchers say they are continuing to probe.(Reporting By Eric Auchard; Editing by Clara Ferreira Marques) Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global This story originally appeared on Reuters Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

Canadian market picking up steam for Eurail 2 weeks left for Extra

first_img TORONTO — More than 16,000 Canadian passengers travelled through Europe on Eurail trains in 2016, and while it was a tough year from all inbound markets the rail company saw an uptick from Canada in the last few months.“It was a challenging year for us but especially from Canada we’ve been recovering since October 2016,” said Clarissa Mattos, Market Manager, Americas & Pacific, for Eurail Group. That’s when forward sales started to pick up.It didn’t hurt that Eurail launched its annual end of year promotion in mid-November, offering 20% off all Eurail passes for 2017 travel. The deal was available through the end of last year and not surprisingly “we had an extraordinary December from Canada,” said Mattos.Recently Eurail brought back its popular ‘Extra Days Promotion’, offering travellers up to five additional free travel days on all Eurail Passes purchased now through March 31.The limited-time offer is available across Eurail’s entire portfolio of passes, from the Global Pass to the One Country Pass, and can be purchased up to 11 months before departure.These generous savings are on top of the regular year-round perks that come with purchasing a Pass, like no luggage fees, no pricey airport transfers, city centre arrivals and children 11 years of age and under travel free.More news:  Sunwing ready to launch Mazatlán-Quebec City direct this winterOther benefits of a Eurail Pass include free access to VIP lounges in the main train stations of Austria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Hungary, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Sweden.Global Passes are a big seller from Canada, amounting to half of Eurail’s sales from this market. Global Passes give visitors the flexibility to explore up to 28 European countries at their own pace.The Eurail Select and One Country Passes, meanwhile, provide a number of itinerary options by rail and sea for guests wanting to experience between one and four participating Eurail countries.Eurail has 22 One Country Passes. Passes for Spain and Portugal showed a lot of growth in 2016, says Mattos. Scandinavia was up too. All were seen as ‘safe haven’ destinations by travellers determined to head to Europe last year.A new Eurail France Pass is selling well, notes Mattos. As a destination France had a rockier year than most but there’s no denying the country’s long-term allure. As Mattos says with a smile, “they have the Eiffel Tower.” Eurail’s Italy Switzerland Pass, also new, is selling very well too. Eurail is now including Switzerland’s much-loved Glacier Express in its Passes.More news:  Sunwing to further boost Mazatlán service with new flights from OttawaEurail has also bumped up the maximum age for its Eurail Youth Pass, to 27 years old and younger, so more travellers can take advantage of Youth Pass discounts worth 35% off standard adult prices. Almost 4 in 10 (39%) of Canadians travelling with Eurail are purchasing Youth Passes, says Mattos. Some 57% buy adult passes and 4% are booking Eurail Child Passes, which are free for young travellers ages 4 to 11. Kids under the age of 4 on their first day of travel ride free as well and don’t need a pass.Travelling via Eurail isn’t just about transportation, says Mattos. “It’s a way of discovering Europe.” Eurail is looking to expand its value proposition for travellers with special deals like its exclusive 20 euro discount off pre-booked entrance tickets to Disneyland Paris, for all Eurail Pass holders.For travel agents, Eurail offers discounted fares (up to 75% off). It’s also looking at a specialist program for the retail trade. “We’re working on it,” says Mattos. For product information see eurail.com or one of Eurail’s GSAs including Rail Europe at raileurope.ca. Posted by Thursday, March 16, 2017 << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group center_img Canadian market picking up steam for Eurail; 2 weeks left for Extra Days deal Share Tags: Britain & Europe, Eurail, Rail Europelast_img read more

Short movie channel Shorts TV has chosen playout s

first_imgShort movie channel Shorts TV has chosen playout specialist Chello DMC to provide playout and content management services. Chello DMC will also represent Shorts TV in the Netherlands and Flanders.Shorts TV launched yesterday in both SD and HD on the UPC network in the Netherlands. The service is also available in France, with further European expansion planned over time.Shorts programming is categorised into one-hour or half-hour themed blocks that cover a variety of genres including comedies, musicals, documentaries, thrillers, dramas and animation. The channel will be subtitled in French and Dutch, with additional languages to be added as the channel expands its distribution. The HD channel will be distributed on the Telstar 12 satellite and the feed can be accessed throughout Europe.In addition to the linear channel, Chello DMC will support Shorts in the delivery of video on demand services to its distribution partners.Carter Pilcher, CEO at Shorts International said in a statement: “Chello DMC has first-rate technical broadcasting services and unrivalled expertise in channel playout. They are the ideal broadcast partner to help us expand our channel throughout Europe. With the best in short movies, we are excited to be bringing the channel’s acclaimed content to new audiences across Europe through both live and on demand TV platforms.”last_img read more

TSX Venture 96468 103862 14165

first_img TSX Venture 964.68 1,038.62 1,416.54 Silver Stocks (SIL) 14.86 16.59 20.32 Gold Producers (GDX) 29.69 34.25 43.88 Silver 24.13 27.19 30.36 One Month Ago One Year Ago Rock & Stock Stats Last Copper 3.10 3.33 3.74center_img TSX (Toronto Stock Exchange) 12,438.03 12,422.12 12,014.90 Dear Reader, Last week, our senior precious metals analyst, Jeff Clark, advised: Buy Gold NOW. So far that has worked out well, but it begs the question: What about gold stocks? When do we back up the truck for them? My own answer in the current edition of the International Speculator is that no one really knows, but that those who buy value when its price is low should do very well indeed. Jeff returns this week with a by-the-numbers look at the last two biggest gold stock corrections, comparing them to our market today. This is excellent context we would all do well to remember when asking such questions. Sincerely, Gold 1,470.70 1,574.75 1,637.75 Gold Junior Stocks (GDXJ) 12.20 14.67 22.30 Louis James Senior Metals Investment Strategist Casey Research Oil 93.99 94.45 102.54last_img read more

Thats the latest iteration of the CTCiChip cre

first_img That’s the latest iteration of the CTC-iChip , created by a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School led by Mehmet Toner. The “chip” is about two inches long, one inch wide, and paper thin. It’s designed to capture what are known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to give doctors a way to diagnose and track cancer that is less invasive, cheaper, and more informative than a biopsy. CTCs are shed into the bloodstream by tumors, and their isolation and analysis could lead to early detection of invasive cancers—which is important, because the earlier a patient is diagnosed, the better his or her chances of survival—and help doctors develop better and more personalized treatment regimens. The problem is that these things are rare, typically just 1 to 10 CTCs per billion blood cells. Isolating them has proven difficult over the years. The new CTC-iChip combines multiple technologies like size separation (which takes advantage of the fact that CTCs are larger and stiffer than blood cells) and magnetic-tag separation (which involves tagging white blood cells with magnetic beads so they can be discarded using a magnetic field after the sample is run) to isolate the individual CTCs. Isolating the individual CTCs this way allows scientists to perform single-cell genomic analysis. And that’s important. Consider a cancer biopsy. You can look at the sample and see that the cells are different from one another, yet the way researchers further analyze the sample is by grinding up the tissue and examining the smearing of all the genetic signatures of the different individual cells. This provides you with a rough average of the genetics of all the cells in the sample, but it masks critical differences. For example, the genetics of the metastatic cells are quite different from the cells that won’t spread the disease; with conventional methods of analysis you can’t see that. So you won’t be able to understand what makes the cancer go from a dangerous to a deadly state. By employing single-cell analysis that’s facilitated by this microfluidic chip, physicians can develop a better understanding of the disease, which could lead to more effective personalized treatments. Pretty cool. But it doesn’t stop there. Another new and particularly interesting effort in the area of microfluidics is a play on the well-known system-on-a-chip (SoC) technology from the world of computers. It can be described as human-organs-on-a-chip and could eventually become an invaluable tool that leads to a more efficient drug-discovery process. The idea is not to make replacement organs for transplant, but to replicate enough of an organ’s functions to make the chips useful in testing substances for toxic and therapeutic effects. That has immediate applicability, because a major part of the preclinical phase of drug development involves assessing safety and biological activity in the laboratory—especially in animal studies. (It’s difficult to access reliable figures, but it’s safe to say that billions of dollars a year is spent on animal tests.) The problem with these animal models—without even touching on the various potential ethical issues involved—is that, although they have historically been one of the most trusted tools in drug development, they are not actually all that predictive of the human situation. Not only do animal models fail to identify numerous drugs that are toxic to humans, they also derail drugs that would have been efficacious. Of course this makes sense. Different animals evolved differently and have different biologies. Nevertheless, we continue to rely on expensive, time-consuming, and unreliable animal models in the drug-development process because they’re the best we have. But thanks to advancements in microfluidic technologies, human organs on chips could be a better way. The breakthrough in this area came in mid-2010, when researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard announced they had successfully developed a lung-on-a-chip. The device, which is about the size of a rubber eraser and is made using human lung and blood-vessel cells, actually mimics a living, breathing human lung. It’s essentially a porous membrane with human cells from the lung’s air sac on one side and human capillary blood vessel cells on the other side. There’s air flowing through the channel on the lung side and a medium (like blood) with human blood cells in it flowing through the channel on the capillary side. The whole thing stretches and relaxes like our lungs do when we breathe. And it does a good job replicating the natural responses of living lungs to various stimuli. Just as the living lung-blood interface recognizes invaders such as inhaled bacteria or toxins and activates an immune response, so too does lung-on-a-chip. The researchers tested this by introducing E. coli bacteria into the air channel on the lung side of the device while concurrently adding white blood cells to the channel on the blood vessel side. The lung cells detected the bacteria and, through the porous membrane, activated the blood vessel cells, which in turn triggered an immune response that ultimately caused the white blood cells to move to the air chamber and destroy the bacteria. Lung-on-a-chip was just the beginning. The Wyss Institute also has kidney-on-a-chip, bone-marrow-on-a-chip, and gut-on-a-chip—a silicon polymer device about the size of a flash memory stick that mimics complex 3D features of the human intestine. All could prove to be valuable diagnostic tools in the development of safe and effective new therapeutics. We’re on the cusp of a revolution in life-science research. This revolution promises to bring with it better ways to detect cancer and other diseases, as well as a more efficient drug-discovery process. And it promises these benefits on the cheap—thanks in large part to what’s known as microfluidics. Let’s back up for a moment… back to December 29, 1959. It was then that physicist Richard Feynman gave his now-famous lecture titled There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom, during which he essentially anticipated what we now call nanotechnology. Feynman actually never mentioned the word “nanotechnology” in his talk—and it wasn’t until the 1980s that nanotech researchers began regularly citing his lecture—but what he did do at that time was posit the amazing possibilities afforded by miniaturization, including “miniaturizing the computer.” He foresaw that the clunky “computing machines” of his day would be infinitely more useful if they could be shrunk. At the time of Feynman’s talk, although transistors were beginning to replace vacuum tubes, computers were still huge and grossly inefficient. The IBM Stretch computer of 1959 managed to fit a mere 150,000 transistors into its 33-foot length. Meanwhile, Feynman was talking about wires “that should be 10 or 100 atoms in diameter” and circuits that “should be a few thousand angstroms across.” (One thousand angstroms is equal to 100 nanometers.) By 2011, Intel was mass producing processors with 32-nanometer technology that contained 2.6 billion transistors. Intel’s Xeon server chip that’s due to be released this year has 4.31 billion transistors. And consider that one of today’s smartphones has significantly more computing power than all of NASA circa 1969, when it sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the moon. While it’s true that we don’t yet have the capabilities Feynman envisioned—of building “a billion tiny factories, models of each other, which are manufacturing simultaneously” from the bottom up, atom by atom—his miniaturization-of-computers idea was clearly spot on. So what if we applied his approach to a different area of scientific study… say biology? After all, much of biology today is similar to where electronics was yesterday—except instead of vacuum tubes and cable wires, you have arrays of test tubes and hoses. What if all that “plumbing” used to study biological systems could be shrunk—would we reap the same benefits as we did in electronics? Turns out the answer is yes. And that’s where microfluidics comes in. Microfluidics is the science of fluid dynamics on the micro scale (i.e., millionths of a meter). We’ll spare you the details of the fluid mechanics at this scale—where things like laminar flow, diffusion, capillary effects, and surface tension dominate—and boil things down to one simple idea: Microfluidics and its application is all about conducting biological experiments and tests with really small plumbing. How small is the plumbing we’re talking about? The channels through which the fluids travel in the devices today are roughly the width of a human hair, and sometimes smaller. If you think you’re not already acquainted with the world of microfluidics, think again. Two very recognizable examples of microfluidic technologies are the glucometer to measure blood sugar levels and pregnancy tests. Basically, we’re talking about precisely manipulating fluids—to do things like blood screening for diseases and single-cell genomic analysis—using a microscale device built with technologies that were first developed by the semiconductor industry, and were later expanded into fluidics due to the benefits that accrue from shrinking things. For starters, miniaturization means lower costs, since researchers require much smaller volumes of samples and reagents to conduct experiments and run tests. There’s also the potential for running multiple experiments in parallel and cutting down on the number of steps required to run them. But microfluidics technologies also make novel tasks possible, like giving us the ability to interact with individual cells. Let’s look at another example to explain further. Lung-on-a-chip (top) and Gut-on-a-chip (bottom) The Wyss team’s ultimate goal is to build 10 different human-organs-on-chips and link them together on an automated instrument to mimic whole-body physiology. This could eventually lead to personalized chips that could predict a specific individual’s drug response. The bottom line: In theory, since these microfluidic human-organs-on-chips use human cells and mimic both the mechanics and biology of the organs they represent, they would be more predictive than animal models, so drug failure rates would be lower. Modeling with these chips would cut costs and reduce the time involved in the drug-discovery process. It’s still too early to tell how successful this field of research will be… but the prospects are exciting. Microfluidic technologies for many applications like this are still relatively early stage, but the above examples demonstrate how microfluidics should play an increasingly important role in disease detection and could ultimately disrupt the drug-discovery process for the better. This kind of game-changing technology is what we at Casey Extraordinary Technology specialize in finding and investing in. From cutting-edge biotech drug companies and molecular-diagnostic innovators to the firms that created the 3D printing industry and those that are building the smart grid, the track record of our investment recommendations stands out among all our competitors and truly speaks for itself, with an average gain per closed position during 2013 and 2014 of 66%. To become part of this track record of success, simply sign up for a 90-day, risk-free trial of Casey Extraordinary Technology.last_img read more

Statements submitted to MPs have provided further

first_imgStatements submitted to MPs have provided further evidence of widespread dishonesty among healthcare professionals who carry out disability benefit assessments, but their inquiry has had to be abandoned because of the prime minister’s decision to call a general election.Despite its inquiry into the personal independence payment (PIP) assessment process having to be scrapped, the Commons work and pensions select committee has published written evidence it has received from PIP claimants and disability organisations.The committee held an urgent evidence session about the assessment process in March, a hearing partly triggered by a Disability News Service (DNS) investigation, before seeking further written evidence.DNS had provided the committee with substantial evidence of widespread dishonesty among PIP assessors in the reports they prepare for government decision-makers.The DNS investigation revealed that assessors working for the outsourcing companies Capita and Atos – most of them nurses – had repeatedly lied, ignored written evidence and dishonestly reported the results of physical examinations.DNS has now collected nearly 200 examples of cases in which PIP claimants have said that healthcare professionals working for Capita and Atos produced dishonest assessment reports.DWP has consistently claimed that there is no dishonesty at all among its outsourced healthcare assessors.Inclusion London, the pan-London disabled people’s organisation, provided the most detailed written evidence of all the individuals and groups that contributed to the committee’s inquiry.It said in its evidence: “Again and again Disabled people are reporting that assessors have ignored written and verbal evidence and that reports do not reflect what occurred in the assessment.”Inclusion London quoted widely from evidence compiled by DNS, and concluded: “The extent to which false information is included in assessment reports cannot be attributed to one or two negligent assessors but indicates systemic failings with the current PIP assessment process.”It called for all assessments to be recorded, and for “a clear and accessible system for Disabled people to file complaints against assessors with an independent body and for complaint statistics to be made public”.It also called for a new PIP assessment, based on the social model of disability and created in co-production with disabled people, which focuses on “barriers and the impact of impairment on daily life rather than functionality”.Other written evidence submitted to the committee appears to confirm the conclusions of the DNS investigation.Among those who responded to a survey by Disability Rights UK (DR UK) was a healthcare professional with a first-class degree in physiotherapy.They said they had been “shocked by the level of errors, inaccuracies, omissions and, quite possibly, lies” in the assessment report compiled for their PIP claim, according to DR UK’s evidence to the committee.The respondent concluded that “the musculoskeletal assessment conducted was appalling and could not have provided sufficient information upon which a decision regarding my physical capabilities to carry out work for any period of time could be made.“Lies were also told about the content of the musculoskeletal assessment – data was recorded for tests which were not conducted.”Another DR UK survey respondent described how PIP decisions were often overturned on appeal due to “assessors making inaccurate statements, assessors making false statements, assessors incorrectly interpreting things the claimant said or did”.In its evidence to the committee, the mental health charity Rethink said that respondents to its own survey on PIP “felt that there was a discrepancy between what was discussed at the assessment and the content of the subsequent written report.“We received several examples of PIP applicants claiming that assessors had deliberately misinterpreted them and in… some cases included complete fabrications in their reports.”But the evidence compiled by the committee may now end up being discarded because the decision by Theresa May to call a general election on 8 June means that parliament was dissolved this week, leading to some committee inquiries having to be abandoned.Mark Lucas, a PIP claimant who has spoken out repeatedly about the “shockingly poor and dishonest” assessment system, and has given evidence to an inquiry into PIP assessments set up by Stoke-on-Trent City Council, said the decision to call an election was “another set back at the end of many set backs”.He said: “Clearly the health professionals have been dishonest and the government has gone to great lengths to ensure the PIP scam is kept quiet for as long as possible.“Everyone knows what has gone on is wrong but only few have voiced their concerns.“I am sure if we continue to have the same government the rights of persons with disabilities will be further abused.”A spokeswoman for the committee said the PIP investigation was “one of the inquiries that fell with the announcement of the election”.When the committee is reformed in the new parliament – probably in September – it could choose to relaunch the inquiry, but will be under no obligation to do so, but if it does it could choose to “keep and use the evidence they have now”, she said.last_img read more

Google May Have Violated Wiretap Laws

first_imgTechnology Ray Hennessey 3 min read –shares Guest Writer Google May Have Violated Wiretap Laws Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Image credit: AFP Register Now »center_img In a victory for online privacy advocates but a blow to advertisers, a federal judge in California has ruled Google may have violated wiretapping laws by scanning and reviewing users’ Gmails.Google has long scanned Gmail messages to then target advertising to its users. The company has argued the practice is perfectly within the confines of both federal and state eavesdropping laws because Gmail users give up their privacy as part of Gmail’s Terms of Service contract.U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh disagreed, saying those Terms of Service “did not explicitly notify Plaintiffs that Google would intercept users’ emails for the purposes of creating user profiles or providing targeted advertising.”What’s more, even if Gmail account holders consented to having their emails searched, the people with whom those users are communicating didn’t. Google has claimed that users of, say, Microsoft’s Outlook, should know that Google will view their mail when sent to a Gmail account.Related: Google Looking Beyond ‘Cookies’ to Track People OnlineKoh was unconvinced, saying she “cannot conclude that any party — Gmail users or non-Gmail users — has consented to Google’s reading of email for the purposes of creating user profiles or providing targeted advertising.”The ruling, part of a proposed class action against Google, is a big win for privacy advocates, who have complained that technology companies have too much access to personal information and are not overt enough in explaining how customer information and data are used.The chorus for more protections has only gotten louder since it was revealed that companies like Google shared information with the U.S. government as the National Security Agency spied on American emails, texts and phone calls.Still, companies have long found that there is a potentially high value proposition for advertisers in targeting marketing toward users based on their interests. Google, for instance, has long tied advertising to search results from users. Gmail, it argues, is an extension of that.But Google has found itself more and more in the crosshairs of the privacy-protection crowd. Earlier this month, the company found out its capture of data over open Wi-Fi routers also could violate federal wiretapping laws. Google captured data through cars sent throughout the company to record images for its Google Street View maps. It has said it did so to improve its location-services features, but broader content was captured by the cars.Google is not alone. In theory, Judge Koh’s ruling could affect other companies that mine free email for information to match with advertisers. Yahoo mail, for instance, has a Terms of Service that allows for broader data capture.Court: Facebook Likes Are Protected Speech Next Article September 27, 2013 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Editor-at-Large Add to Queuelast_img read more

Uber Teams Up With Spotify So Passengers Can Play Backseat DJs

first_imgPartnerships Uber Teams Up With Spotify So Passengers Can Play ‘Backseat DJs’ Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Add to Queue Laura Entis Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Guest Writer November 17, 2014center_img It’s official: After rumblings on Friday that Uber was teaming up with Spotify, the ridesharing service officially announced the partnership this morning in a blog post.“We’ve joined forces with Spotify, a world leader in streaming music, to enable you to remotely control the music that plays through your Uber’s speakers,” the company’s senior product manager wrote. “Whether you’re starting the night with your pre-party mix or unwinding with a chill playlist on your way home, the choice is now yours with Uber.”Related: Lyft Says Former COO Took Confidential Files With Him to UberTo play “backseat DJ,” you first need to connect your Spotify account with your Uber profile; when you request a ride, a music bar will appear at the bottom of the Uber app and you can select a playlist from your Spotify account while you wait for your car to show (although this only works if you get a music-enabled car, a detail that’s apparently stressing out Uber drivers with older vehicles who fear they’ll be penalized for not offering the service).Get in the car, and viola – your soundtrack will automatically start playing.For both companies, the partnership makes sense. On Uber’s part, it’s a way to differentiate itself from archrival Lyft, while Spotify (currently caught up in a tiff of its own with…Taylor Swift) gets increased exposure and presumably, new customers.The feature is slated to launch this Friday in 10 major cities, including London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, New York, San Francisco and Sydney with additional rollouts coming in the next few weeks. Related: Uber, Lyft Find Ally in New York’s Attorney General Next Article Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. –shares 2 min read Register Now »last_img read more