Is There a Long Tail for Ad Networks

first_imgThat’s because small ad networks can aggregate traffic that was previously too difficult, costly or undesirable to aggregate, the report says. (According to the report, the top 100 publishers sell only 40 percent of their online inventory directly, leaving the rest to be chopped up and sold through ad networks or exchanges.) “In a world without ad networks, few online publishers would be able to sell their online advertising inventory.”The future, according to DeSilva + Phillips, lies in ad exchanges: “There is still a lot of ungathered and unsold inventory, and ad exchanges offer considerable scale to advertisers while remaining too small to attract Google or Yahoo!’s attention as bolt-on additions.”All of this means M&A opportunity for those operating small-to-mid-sized ad networks. During 2007, activity approached $2 billion for 10 “pure play” ad networks. Venture capital investment was $300 million.[EDITOR’S NOTE: Click here for a free copy of DeSilva + Phillips’ Ad Networks: Monetizing the Long Tail.] There’s still a lot of Internet out there. And for publishers joining—or cobbling together— mini ad networks, that means revenue.So says a new white paper released late last week by media investment banking firm DeSilva + Phillips. According to the report, Ad Networks: Monetizing the Long Tail, the approval of Google’s $3.1 billion acquisition of DoubleClick shouldn’t spell doom for smaller ad networks.DeSilva + Phillips foresees a “long tail” of revenue, profit and scale for the smaller ad networks that remain. Or, as they put it: “Online advertising networks have emerged as an essential vehicle for monetizing the Long Tail of the Internet.”last_img read more

Nissan Tamil Nadu close to settling incentives feud in a major win

first_img IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Theresa May hails Nissans investment as fantastic news for UK post-Brexit Nissan recalls 3.5 million vehicles over faulty airbag . Pictured: Nissan LogoNissannewsNissan Motor Co and authorities in Tamil Nadu are close to settling a dispute over which the Japanese carmaker initiated international arbitration, seeking more than Rs. 49 billion in unpaid dues and damages, as per sources.Under the proposed settlement, which could be finalised as early as this week, Nissan would take a lower payout of about 20 billion rupees in unpaid dues and forego sums it has sought in damages, two sources aware of the matter said.The resolution would be a victory for Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who faces a general election next year and has spent the last four years trying to transform India’s image as a business-friendly nation.Nissan sent a legal notice to the Modi government in 2016, seeking payment of incentives it said it was due from the government of Tamil Nadu as part of a 2008 agreement to set up a car manufacturing plant in the southern state.The carmaker, in its notice, had claimed 29 billion rupees in unpaid incentives and 21 billion rupees in damages, plus interest and other costs. The Tamil Nadu government has since paid some money and now owes Nissan about 20 billion rupees in unpaid incentives, one of the sources said.According to the proposal, the two sides are close to agreement on, the state would pay the automaker 3 billion rupees upfront once the deal was signed, with the remainder paid by the end of 2019 in 10 instalments, the sources said. Guillaume Sicard, President of Nissan India, poses during the launch of their Datsun Redi-GO compact hatchback car in Mumbai, India, June 7, 2016.Reuters fileNissan would drop the arbitration case against India once the settlement was agreed, the sources said. The proposal has been drawn up by state government officials and Nissan India executives and needs to be approved by Tamil Nadu’s chief minister and the carmaker’s executives in Japan before it is finalised, one of the sources said.M. C. Sampath, Tamil Nadu’s industries minister, confirmed the state was in advanced talks with Nissan. “A final decision on this matter will be taken soon, there is a conducive environment that prevails between the two parties now,” he said, without commenting on the detail of the proposal.The Nissan case, covered by a bilateral trade and investment agreement between New Delhi and Tokyo, is one of more than 20 international arbitration proceedings brought by investors against India, among the highest against any single nation.Companies including Vodafone Group, Cairn Energy and Deutsche Telekom have initiated arbitration seeking to protect their investments against retrospective tax claims and cancellation of contracts. India last year cancelled investment treaties with about 50 foreign governments, making it harder for investors to seek international arbitration for disputes.center_img Closelast_img read more

Google Holdem Poker Does Google Have An OS Up Their Sleeve

first_img How DNA outside cells can be targeted to prevent the spread of cancer Net Applications came up with the novel discovery that somewhere between 11-percent to 30-percent of Web traffic streaming out of Google is cleaned of identifying information. The call of the story is, “That begs the question: What secret is it that Google doesn’t want the rest of the Web to know.” Sounds mysterious, it’s too bad the writer and Net Applications didn’t read, Forbes’ How To Erase Your Tracks Online, or for non-readers In Pictures: Eight Ways To Guard Your Online Privacy, September 08, 2008 slide show. The Boy Genius Report casts a “Ree-hee-healy?” to Net Applications’ blockbuster discovery which in sum goes, “We have never seen an OS stripped of the user agent string before.” I believe you have to arrange to have that happen, it’s not something we have seen before in a proxy server.” Net Applications, “The Movie” then sums up the insidious plot by saying. “All I can tell you is there’s a good percentage of the people at Google showing up [at Web pages] with their OS hidden,” according to a Net Applications spokesperson. Boy Genius, has his own idea of the Google’s Magical Mystery OS. See: Google Working on a New Mystery OS, December 6 post. His post and comments take some of the air out of the floating rumors. It’s worth a fun read time. Google Watch by Clint Boulton, congratulates his former colleague Andy Patrizio for “ferretting out a fascinating new Google rumor” spawned by his interview of a Net Applications spokesperson. His conclusion is essentially, if many Googlers are running a clandestine OS of an undetermined origin, “this would fit the Google MO, wouldn’t it?”, referencing the September 2 launch of Chrome after two-years of back and forth. Blount is hardly awestruck by the idea Google might want to go it alone with their own OS and in the process cut into Microsoft’s behemoth IE. His sources speculate that the “Web Only” browser Chrome could be the front door to access some kind of big social network where OpenID reigns or possibly a combo of Chrome and its extension application Gears. He quotes Rob Enderle of the Enderle Group, who said a Google OS would be an extension of Android OS recently released for mobile phones and big plans for future devices. Blount presents a query, “Could Google employees be surfing the Web on Android phones? Comments on the Forbes, “Google’s Invisibility Cloak” are priceless. Credit where credit is due goes to “Levifig” referencing Google’s penchant for secrecy, he posts the following, ” Secrecy isn’t the opposite of Openness in the business world! Why would Google let other companies into their business strategy?? Why would they have a great idea and have their competitors market it, especially when most of their competitors would charge what they would release for free?? Seriously…” Another gem by “Fantomaster” who isn’t sure if he should laugh or cry at the speculation about Google’s anonymity mystery. His insightful post points out that faking UAs is like an Al Gore moment. It is has been done for years and “Incidentally it’s one of the tenets of safeguarding your online privacy, too.” Personally, I sure hope these two don’t read my articles.In preparation for this story, I found a recent paper by Andrew G. Morgan of Google Inc. and Serge E. Hallyn entitled, “Linux Capabilities: Making Them Work”. The paper addresses the modern applications of the Linux system in light of new kernel developments including VFS support and per-process support for bounded-set and secure-bits demonstating the full range of Linux security capabilities. I contacted Andrew G. Morgan for his take on the Google Hold’em Poker OS rumor, but as of this writing I have not heard back.Forbes Google’s Invisibility Cloak story:www.forbes.com/technology/2008 … x_ew_1205google.htmlBoy Genius Blog story: www.boygeniusreport.com/2008/1 … on-a-new-mystery-os/© 2008 PhysOrg.com Citation: Google Hold’em Poker: Does Google Have An OS Up Their Sleeve? (2008, December 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-12-google-holdem-poker-os-sleeve.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img (PhysOrg.com) — Google card shark watchers have been placing side bets on the possibility that Google may be holding back some news on a new OS. The search giant has been the subject of rumors in Forbes, BoyGenius Blog, Google Watch and more. Forbes’ intriguing article title is, ” Google’s Invisibility Cloak” stokes the fire with a not so “Elementary my dear Watson” approach. The genesis of the speculation is a “Eureka” moment from Net Applications a company in Aliso Viejo that produces an analytic software for tracking Internet trends around the world. Explore furtherlast_img read more